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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 223 223 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 45 45 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 20 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 16 16 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 13 13 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1831 AD or search for 1831 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
a distinguished part in the war of the Rebellion. By the second marriage By the same marriage he had, as his thirteenth and last child, Jesse, who was the father of Harriot, the second wife of Nathan Appleton of Boston, a member of Congress in 1831-33, and again in 1842. It may be noted, that one of Mr. Appleton's daughters, by his first marriage, married Robert J. Mackintosh, who was the son of Sir James, the English publicist and historian; and another married Henry W. Longfellow, the poe on the opposite side of the way. One of his sons was William Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1804, a judge of the police court of Boston, and the father of William H. Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1831, and of Rev. George F. Simmons, of the class of 1832. Judge Simmons and Charles Pinckney Sumner were faithful friends, and their families maintained an intimacy. Joshua Hersey, a brother of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, lived on Prospect Street in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
e festive occasions, such guests as Chief Justices Parker and Shaw, Judges Prescott, Putnam, Wilde, Morton, Hubbard, Thacher, Simmons, Solicitor General Davis, Governor Lincoln, Josiah Quincy, John Pickering, Harrison Gray Otis, William Minot, Timothy Fuller, Samuel E. Sewall; and, among the clergy, Gardiner, Tuckerman, Greenwood, Pierpont, and Lyman Beecher. His son Charles, and his son's classmates, Hopkinson and Browne, were, once at least, among the youngest guests. He gave a dinner, in 1831, to surviving classmates; at which were present Pickering, Jackson, Thacher, Mason, and Dixwell. He made the duties and history of his office the subject of elaborate research. He read to the bar, and published in the American Jurist, July, 1829, a learned exposition of the points of difference between the office in England and in Massachusetts, stating clearly its duties in each jurisdiction, and giving sketches of his predecessors in office. No sheriff in this country, probably, has ev
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
ast an excess, though invariably bold and strong, remarkably and unusually so. I am right glad to see this improvement in your style. It was a desideratum; almost the only one. Macte nova virtute Sumner's letters to Tower and Stearns, which are preserved, are playful, abound in Latin phrases and other quotations, and are rather carelessly written. Neither in thought nor in style are they superior to the similar compositions of most young men of his age and education. As the summer of 1831 waned, Sumner felt seriously that he must, without delay, begin in earnest the study of a profession, or take up some occupation which would be at once remunerative. He was very reluctant to draw any further on his father, who had now to provide for the education of younger sons and daughters. He questioned, too, his chances of success in the legal profession, or at least of attaining his ideal in it. His thoughts turned to school-keeping for a time, as assuring immediate revenues; but a te
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
ver before inclined to it. I think your Stranger in America is not in the Boston market. A young friend of mine, a son of Professor Greenleaf, who read it on my hint, is ravished with it, and tried to get a couple of copies to present to his friends. His mother and father were delighted with it. Yours ever, Chas. Sumner. To Rev. Dr. John G. Palfrey, Dr. Palfrey was born in 1796, and is still a resident of Cambridge. He was professor of sacred literature in Harvard University, 1831-39; and a member of Congress, 1847-49. among his various contributions to literature is a history of New England. his article on Lord Mahon's history of England,-printed in the North American Review, of which he was for several years the editor,—was in Sumner's judgment one of the best specimens of criticism which our country has produced. Allibone's Dictionary of authors, Vol. II. p. 1491. Sumner began his first political speech, Nov. 4, 1845, with a tribute to Dr. Palfrey for his manumi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
1833 he became a Professor of Greek Literature and Philosophy, in the College of France, and in 1838 resigned his chair to become Librarian of the University. In 1831 he was elected to the Chamber of Deputies. In 1840 he was appointed on the royal commission of public instruction. His plans for radical improvements not being serminier Jean Louis Eugene Lerminier, 1803-1857. He was at first an advocate, but left the bar to study literature and jurisprudence. He became a professor in 1831. His lectures were singularly attractive for their eloquence and animation of style. He contributed to journals and reviews, particularly the Revue des deux Mond remainder of the time. Feb. 17. This morning again followed Dubois in his wards; and also Jules Cloquet Baron Jules Germain Cloquet, 1790-. He succeeded in 1831 to the chair of Clinical Surgery. He was the author of a treatise on Human Anatomy, and the inventor of surgical instruments. He published Recollections of Lafay
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
issier, whose place was very conspicuous, being directly on a level with the President, sat with his chair on its hind-legs. Another,—M. Salvandy 1795-1856. the Minister of Public Instruction,—sat for some time, cutting with his pen-knife the mahogany desk before him. There were a good many speakers, one of whom was quite prominent, being able, eloquent, and humorous. This was the Count Jaubert. Count Hippolyte Francois Jaubert was born in 1798. He was in the Chamber of Deputies from 1831 to 1844. In 1840 he received the portfolio of Public Works. He was one of the four members of the National Assembly, who, in the vote of July 10, 1872, opposed the treaty of evacuation with Germany. He is noted as a botanist. He died in 1875 or 1876, while a member of the Chamber of Deputies. He made a severe attack on the ministry, which produced a sensible effect. He was very witty and caustic, and was constantly interrupted by exclamations of tres bien, or by murmurs of dissent, or mo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
secondary character. But here I am in famous London town, and my wonder still attends me; but it is of an entirely different quality from that 1 Established in 1831, in King Street, Covent Garden, for literary men, and particularly for those who were by profession or tastes specially interested in the drama. Its collection ofrd; Secretary of Legation in Spain in 1810; Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain, 1815-16; to Switzerland in 1823; and to the United States, 1825-35 (with an absence, 1831-33). His friendly relations at Washington with Judge Story brought the latter into a correspondence with Mr. Justice Vaughan, a brother of Sir Charles. Story's LiJames Parke, 1782-1868. He assisted the Crown officers in the prosecution of Queen Caroline; was made a judge of the King's Bench in 1828, and of the Exchequer in 1831; resigned in 1855, and was upon his resignation raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Wensleydale. A second patent was issued to remove a disability from