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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 223 223 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 45 45 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 20 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 16 16 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 13 13 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15.. You can also browse the collection for 1831 AD or search for 1831 AD in all documents.

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riter of Medford was Lydia Maria (Francis) Child, a sister of Rev. Converse Francis. Her first novel, Hobomok, published in 1824, when she was only twenty-three years of age, was a great success, and was soon followed by the Rebels in 1825. She edited a periodical for children called Juvenile Miscellany, afterwards published as Flowers for Children. The Frugal Housewife; Evenings in New England, 1826; First Settlers of New England, 1829; The Girl's Own Book; The Coronal; The Mother's Book, 1831; and the Ladies' Family Library, four volumes of short biographies, followed in quick succession. Some of her books reached twenty-five editions and were translated and printed abroad. In 1833 she wrote a pamphlet, An Appeal for that Class of Americans Called Africans, which cost her her popularity as woman and writer. She never faltered in her work for the anti-slavery cause, however, but left her home and went to New York to edit the Anti-Slavery Standard, wrote Incidents in the Life o
ghtmare in those days to many a poor soul battling with poverty. The town had the usual barn and out-buildings near by, including the crazy pen, where a few unfortunates bereft of reason were kept. Happily such are cared for in these days in a different manner, and not exposed to the view of idle passers, or the teasing of ill-mannered youths who need the parental discipline of birch or shingle; but such were the conditions of those days. Of this latter, mention is made advisedly, for in 1831 the schoolhouse, built elsewhere two years before, was moved into the corner of the almshouse lot, as a more convenient site, and fronted on the canal lane. In 1835 the Lowell railroad was opened for travel, having been constructed through the town's land and within two rods of the house. In 1851 the great tornado which wrought such havoc in West Cambridge (now Arlington) and Medford totally wrecked this schoolhouse, but did little damage to the almshouse. Fortunately there were no child