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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for January 31st, 1831 AD or search for January 31st, 1831 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
cally, it may be inferred that Joseph Garrison was uxorious, since at least five of his children were named for his wife's relatives. The Palmer type was also well supplied with firmness; had high cheek-bones, fair skin and hair; was of a quizzical and jocose temperament. From this side of the house were probably derived the characteristics of the Garrison-Palmer offspring indicated in the following extract of a letter from William Garrison (the son of Joseph) to his nephew Andrew (Jan. 31, 1831): I think it a family trait that we are apt to be too sanguine and enthusiastic in many of our pursuits, which may cast a mist prejudicial to our true interests. . . . That would-be witty Devil has more than once proved injurious to our family. It should be further noted that the Palmers were full-lived. Sergeant John lived to be 72; his son Francis to be 76; his son John to be 74; his son Daniel to be 65 at least. William Lloyd Garrison died in his 74th year, far surpassing his fathe