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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 259 259 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 58 58 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 20 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 18 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1832 AD or search for 1832 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
. Martha Hersey, a sister of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, married Elisha Simmons, of Hanover, who died, in 1825, at the age of eighty. The site of his residence is near that of Perez Simmons, but on the opposite side of the way. One of his sons was William Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1804, a judge of the police court of Boston, and the father of William H. Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1831, and of Rev. George F. Simmons, of the class of 1832. Judge Simmons and Charles Pinckney Sumner were faithful friends, and their families maintained an intimacy. Joshua Hersey, a brother of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, lived on Prospect Street in South Hingham, under Prospect Hill, a well-known landmark. Upon this estate now live his children. of Hingham, and died in 1799, at the age of thirty-six. His home was but a short distance from his father's, and its site is now occupied by the residence of Perez Simmons. The first child of David, J
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
rsy. He was a diligent reader of the newspapers and pamphlets on the subject, with which the period abounded, particularly of Mr. Hallett's Free Press, which he frequently posted to his friends. He is supposed to have contributed articles to this newspaper, and even to have had charge of it for a short time, during the editor's absence. He was an admirer of eminent Anti-masons, like Richard Rush and William Wirt, the latter of whom he hoped to see elected President at the next election, of 1832. He pressed the great and good cause of Anti-masonry, as he called it, on his favorite classmates, Browne, Hopkinson, Hopkinson wrote, May 10, Leave off reading newspapers, and forget politics till you are thirty; by so doing you may redeem the pledge which Webster says the public hold of you. Tower, Stearns, and Frost; but, while they were not partisans of the Order, they did not sympathize with his ardent support of its political opponents. When he portrayed in his letters the danger
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
for several years in Hallowell, Me., and removed, in 1854, to Boston, where he is still one of the leaders of the bar. who entered Sumner's class in the spring of 1832, and whose acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School even his books. Miss Frances A. Kemble, the daughter of Charles Kemble, the English actor, and the niece of Mrs. Siddons, came with her father to this country in 1832, three years after her debut at Covent Garden in the character of Juliet. She was then but twenty-one years old; and her youth added to the fascination of her bri, were preparing him for the lofty stand he attained in after life. Professor William C. Russell, of Cornell University, who saw much of Sumner at Cambridge in 1832-33, writes: — He was a tall, thin, bent, ungainly law-student; his eyes were inflamed by late reading, and his complexion showed that he was careless of ex
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
834, Vol. XI. pp. 320-338. in which some technical questions are treated; Characters of Law Books and Judges, July, 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 5-66. The materials for this article were largely furnished by a memorandum-book, in which, beginning with 1832, he had been accustomed to write, from time to time, opinions of law books gathered in his reading. a voluminous collection of opinions; Replevin of Goods taken in Execution,—Error in the Books, July, 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 104-117. Browne wrote,ripts to the father's letter. Professor Greenleaf gratefully acknowledged his reports of his visit to Chancellor Kent and of life in Washington. One of the daughters of Mr. Peters thus describes him at this time:— It was somewhere about 1832 I think, in the summer-time, that Charles Sumner led me—then a little girl—and my father over Harvard Library; and it has always been to me a beautiful memory,—the recollection of this slender, bright-eyed youth, with what seemed to me an adori
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
eal, their inner life to each other. Rarely in history has there been a fellowship so beautiful as that of these gifted young men. The riot in Broad Street, June 11, 1837, brought on by a collision between a fire-engine company and an Irish funeral procession, was the beginning of a friendship between Sumner and Dr. Samuel G. Howe. Dr. Howe was born Nov. 10, 1801, and died Jan. 9, 1876. From 1824 to 1830 he was in Greece, serving that country in the army and in other capacities. From 1832 until his death he was an instructor of the blind, and engaged in philanthropic movements. Five hundred combatants were engaged, and a body of bystanders obstructed the streets. The Irish were worsted, and pursued to their homes. Well-known citizens-Abbott Lawrence, Robert C. Winthrop, Josiah Quincy, Jr., and others—supported Mayor Eliot, who was on the ground, in his efforts to restore order. Sumner went with them to the scene, and, then as always unconscious of personal fear, pushed into
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Penal Law; was associated with Sismondi in publishing Annals of Legislation and Political Economy; and was a member of the Diet and Council. Removing to Paris, in 1832, he was appointed Professor of Political Economy in the College of France; and, in 1834, Professor of Constitutional Law. He became the political associate of Guized the first Italian tenor of his time. (Don Ottavio); Tamburini Antonio Tamburini, 1800-1876. After singing in Italian theatres, he appeared first in Paris in 1832. He retired from the stage in 1854. (Don Giovanni); Lablache Luigi Lablache, 1794-1858; the celebrated basso. He succeeded both in the serious and the comic oand in 1854 in the United States. (Donna Anna); and Madame Persiani Madame Persiani (nee Fanny Tacchinardi), 1818-1867. Her first appearance was at Leghorn, in 1832. She appeared in Paris, in 1837, in Francesca da Rimini. (Zerlina), the latter a debutante of the season, and to my taste equal to Grisi herself in many points, t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
f the Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Spring Rice's Thomas Spring Rice, 1790-1866. He represented Limerick in Parliament from 1820 to 1832, and Cambridge from 1832 to 1839; was Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department in 1827; Secretary of the Treasury from 1830 to 1834; Secretary of State for 1832 to 1839; was Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department in 1827; Secretary of the Treasury from 1830 to 1834; Secretary of State for the Colonies in 1834; Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1835 to September, 1839, when he was appointed Comptroller-General of the Exchequer. He was made a peer, Sept. 5, 1839, with the title of Baron Monteagle. In Parliament he advocated liberal measures. He married for his second wife, in 1841, a daughter of John Marshall of HaJoseph Parkes, the Birmingham Solicitor. The latter I know quite well; Joseph Parkes, 1796-1865. He was first a solicitor at Birmingham; removed to London in 1832, and was taxing master of the Court of Exchequer from 1847 until his death. He published a History of the Court of Chancery, and was a writer for Reviews. The Me
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
was an early writer for the Westminster Review. Autobiography of Mill, pp. 81, 96. He represented Bath in Parliament from 1832 to 1837, and from 1841 to 1847; and Sheffield from 1849 to 1869; and, after a defeat in 1869, was chosen again for Sheffieturdy and graceful witnesses of centuries, I know much less about. I am the guest of Mr. Ingham, Robert Ingham, M. P., 1832-1841 and 1852-1868, for South Shields near Westoe, where he was born and died. He was educated at Oxford, and in 1820 joithere is a fourth,—John A. Murray, the present Lord-Advocate of Scotland. John Archibald Murray was in Parliament from 1832 to 1835; succeeded Francis Jeffrey, in 1834, as Lord-Advocate, and, losing the office in a few months, resumed it in 1835,as Earl of Leicester and a descendant of Sir Edward Coke. He represented the County of Norfolk in Parliament from 1776 to 1832, and was known as the first Commoner of England. He was faithful to the Whig party. In 1837 he was created a peer, with