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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 259 259 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 17 17 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for 1833 AD or search for 1833 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

e testimony of his contemporaries represents him as a firm yet moderate partisan; a statesman of singularly disinterested views; a most steadfast and loyal friend; and a man of warm, pure affections, cheerful, generous, and honorable. The happy influence of such a character and career upon a band of younger brothers cannot be over-estimated, especially when they saw virtue crowned with a success which met neither check nor reverse from its beginning in 1805 to the close of an honored life in 1833. He was a man well beloved, and well deserving the love of his fellow-men. His conduct toward his brothers not only illustrates the warmth of his affections, but exerted a powerful influence over the destinies of his family. As they approached man's estate he directed and aided in their education, invited them to his home, and advanced them in their professions. Darius was graduated at Transylvania, and studied law with Hon. William T. Barry, afterward Postmaster-General. Orramel and
ections of a successful politician. his Premonitions of civil War. another letter. death of J. S. Johnston, by steamboat explosion. his only son, William. 1832-33. Mrs. Johnston's illness. Malpractice of the times. pulmonary consumption developed. Lieutenant Johnston resigns. visit to Mountains of Virginia and Atlantic cert Sidney Johnston entertained any serious purpose of making a home in Louisiana, the shock of his brother's untimely end turned him from it. In the winter of 1832-33 great commercial distress in Louisville would have prevented the sale of real estate for such investment. Mrs. Johnston seemed to be recovering her wonted health, and the spring and summer of 1833 were passed happily at Jefferson Barracks, with no greater anxiety than c a little cholera in St. Louis, of which Lieutenant Johnston writes to his friend, E. D. Hobbs, of Louisville, As we have seen it before in its worst form, we will meet it now with a steady front. This brief and touching min
Spanish occupation. early history. Philip Nolan. boundary disputes. Revolutionary measures. Magee's expedition. Mina's and long's attempts. Moses Austin. Stephen F. Austin. his colony. the Fredonian War. Federal Constitution. Mexican jealousy. Bustamante's arbitrary and centralized Government. oppression of Texas. Colonel Bradburn's tyranny. resistance of colonists in 1832. Anahuac campaign. Bradburn's defeat. Piedras compromises. Convention of San Felipe. Convention of 1833. Santa Anna. Austin's imprisonment. Santa Anna's Revolution. population of Texas. Santa Anna's attempt to establish military despotism. resistance. Moore's fight on the Guadalupe. capture of Goliad. Bowie's combat at conception mission. Cos surrenders San Antonio. the General Consultation of 1835. Provisional Government. Declaration of independence. David G. Burnet. Santa Anna invades Texas. dissensions of colonists. want of preparation. Mexican atrocities. William B. Travi
ite of treaty stipulations to the contrary between the United States and Mexico, a formidable body of Cherokees, Shawnees, Kickapoos, Delawares, and Quapaws, numbering 1,530 warriors and five times as many souls, entered Texas in the winter of 1832-33-about the time of General Houston's arrival in the State. No people could suffer such an invasion without disquietude; and accordingly we find that the empresarios, Messrs. Austin, Milam, and Burnet, early in 1833, addressed a memorial to Gener1833, addressed a memorial to General Bustamante, calling attention to the facts. Colonel Bean, too, commanding the Eastern Department, made a similar complaint to General Cass, United States Secretary of War, remonstrating against this breach of the treaty of 1831, by which both parties bind themselves expressly to restrain by force all hostilities and incursions on the part of the Indians living within their respective boundaries. It is hard to see how any rights accrued to these Indians, constituting fifteen-sixteenths of th
between the slaveholding and non-slaveholding States came to an issue. Springing primarily, doubtless, from the difference in social organization, the more immediate causes of strife were certain real or imaginary collisions of material interests, a different mode of interpreting the Constitution, and the agitation for the abolition of negro-slavery. Of the first, there were none so vital as to be incapable of adjustment, as had been shown in the tariff compromise with South Carolina in 1832-33. Nor would theoretical differences about the Constitution have assumed so dangerous a form, unless they had been embodied in a sectional or revolutionary movement. But, at the South, it was the Northern method of dealing with the slavery question which was considered not only sectional and revolutionary, but unjust and dangerous to its property and liberties. The material interests and social and political difficulties involved in the slavery question rendered it impossible for the South