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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 259 259 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 17 17 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1833 AD or search for 1833 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 259 results in 225 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abercrombie, John Joseph, 1802-1877 (search)
Abercrombie, John Joseph, 1802-1877 Military officer; born in Tennessee in 1802; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1822. Entering the 1st Infantry, he was its adjutant from 1825 to 1833. Serving in Florida and Mexico, he was promoted to brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallantry in the battle of Monterey, where he was severely wounded. He was commissioned lieutenant-colonel in May, 1852, and colonel in February, 1861, and was brevetted brigadier-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865. In June following he retired. He was a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Civil War, and commanded a brigade in Patterson's division on the Upper Potomac in 1861. He was transferred to Bank's division in July. Early in 1862 he joined the Army of the Potomac, and was slightly wounded in the battle of fair Oaks (q. v.). He died in Roslyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolitionists. (search)
ments of effort and intention, was no longer a doctrine to be quietly and benignantly discussed by slave-owners. On Jan. 1, 1831, Garrison began publishing The liberator, in Boston; the New England Anti-Slavery Society was formed Jan. 1, 1832; in 1833 Garrison visited England, and secured from Wilberforce, Zachary Macaulay, Daniel O'Connell, and other English abolitionists, a condemnation of the colonizationists. In December, 1833, the American Anti-Slavery Society was organized, in Philadelphe and earnest men, such as Weld, May, and Phillips, journeyed through the Northern States as the agents of the National Society, founding State branches and everywhere lecturing on abolition, and were often met by mob violence. In Connecticut, in 1833, Miss Prudence Crandall, of Canterbury, opened her school for negro girls. The Legislature, by act of May 24, 1833, forbade the establishment of such schools, and imprisoned Miss Crandall. Being set at liberty, she was ostracized by her neighbor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adair, John, 1759-1840 (search)
Adair, John, 1759-1840 Military officer; born in Chester county, S. C., in 1759. He served in the Continental army during the Revolution, and in the wars against the frontier Indians in 1791-93. He was United States Senator in Congress in 1805-6; and as volunteer aide to General Shelby at the battle of the Thames, in 1813, he showed much bravery and skill. He distinguished himself as commander of the Kentucky troops in the battle of New Orleans, in January, 1815. From 1820 to 1824 he was governor of Kentucky, having served in the legislature of that State; and from 1831 to 1833 was a Representative in Congress. He died in Harrodsburg, Ky., May 19, 1840.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry A., Jr. (search)
Adams, Henry A., Jr. Born in Pennsylvania in 1833. Graduated at Annapolis in 1851. Took part in the engagement with the forts at the mouth of Canton River, China, in 1854. Was on the Brooklyn at the passage of Forts St. Philip and Jackson in 1862, and also participated in the attack on Fort Fisher. Was highly praised by Admiral Porter in his official despatches.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agricultural implements. (search)
ated, he did a very successful business as a maker of these implements, and his plans have been the basis of most all those of modern construction. The first steam-plough in the United States was patented by E. C. Bellinger, of South Carolina, in 1833, but did not come into practical use until much later. Perhaps the Great plough. invented by Daniel Webster, which was twelve feet long, drawn by four yoke of oxen, and turned a furrow two feet wide and one foot deep, may be regarded as the unthes which revolved on a pivot. It did not prove very successful. Two or three other like machines were patented in the following twenty-five years. In 1831 the Manney mower was patented, which was the first successful machine of the kind. In 1833, Mr. Obed Hussey, of Cincinnati. O., patented a reaper, with saw-toothed cutters and guards, which was immediately put into practical operation, and proved thoroughly satisfactory. In 1834, Cyrus H. McCormick, then of Virginia, and late of Chica
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-slavery Society, American, (search)
Anti-slavery Society, American, An organization founded in Philadelphia. Pa., in 1833, by delegates from several State and city societies in the Northern and Eastern States, the first local one having been established in Boston, Jan. 16, 1832, under the leadership of William Lloyd Garrison. The presidents of the national society were Arthur Tappan, Lindley Coates, William Lloyd Garrison, and Wendell Phillips, and in its membership were the leading abolitionists of the day. The members, individually, were subjected for many years to mob violence, and the feeling in the South against the society was exceedingly bitter. The members heroically kept together, in spite of persecution and personal assault, till April 9, 1870, when, on the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment to the national Constitution, the main society was disbanded. See Colonization Society, American; Liberia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Apportionment, congressional, (search)
e United States Constitution 30,000 From 1793 to 1803 based on the United States Census of179033,000 From 1803 to 1813 based on the United States Census of180033,000 From 1813 to 1823 based on the United States Census of181035,000 From 1823 to 1833 based on the United States Census of182040,000 From 1833 to 1843 based on the United States Census of183047,700 From 1843 to 1853 based on the United States Census of184070,680 From 1853 to 1863 based on the United States Census of185093,420 FUnited States Census of182040,000 From 1833 to 1843 based on the United States Census of183047,700 From 1843 to 1853 based on the United States Census of184070,680 From 1853 to 1863 based on the United States Census of185093,420 From 1863 to 1873 based on the United States Census of1860127,381 From 1873 to 1883 based on the United States Census of1870131,425 From 1883 to 1893 based on the United States Census of1880151,912 From 1893 to 1903 based on the United States Census of1890173,901
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
Parry. Franklin explored the North American coast, but nothing else was accomplished by these expeditions. Mr. Scoresby, a whaleman. and his son, had penetrated to 81° N. lat, in 1806. His experience led him to advise an expedition with boats fixed on sledges, to be easily dragged on the ice. With an expedition so fitted out. Captain Parry sailed for the polar waters in 1827. This expedition was a failure. Captain Ross was in the polar waters again from May, 1829, until the midsummer of 1833. The party had been given up as lost. Another party had started in search of Ross, explored the north coast of America, and discovered Victoria Land. Other land expeditions followed; and one, under Dr. John Rae, completed a survey of the north coast of the American continent in the spring of 1847. Sir John Franklin yet believed a northwest passage possible. With two vessels — the Erebus and Terror--each fitted with a small steam-engine and screw-propeller, he sailed from England May 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 (search)
Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 Naval officer; born in Princeton, N. J., May 7, 1774. At the age of sixteen years he went to sea, and at nineteen commanded a ship. On the reorganization of the navy in 1798 he was appointed a lieutenant. He and his vessel and crew were captured in the West Indies by a French cruiser in September of that year, but were released in December, when, returning home, he was promoted to the command of a brig. In May, 1800, he was commissioned a captain, and in the ship Washington be carried tribute from the United States to the Dey of Algiers, by whom he was treated with much insolence. By threats of capture and a declaration of war by the Algerine ruler, he was compelled to take an embassy to Constantinople for that petty despot. On his return, with power given him by the William Bainbridge. Sultan, Bainbridge frightened the insolent Dey, compelling him to release all Christian prisoners then in his possession. He returned to the United States i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 (search)
Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 Military engineer: born in Sheffield, Mass., May 19, 1815; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1833, and entered the engineer corps. He was made captain in 1838; major in 1858; brevet brigadier-general of volunteers in 1861; lieutenant-colonel of regulars in 1863; brevet major-general of volunteers in 1864; brevet brigadier-general and brevet major-general of regulars, March, 1865; and colonel of the corps of engineers, regular army, Dec. 28, the same year. During the war with Mexico he fortified Tampico, and made surveys of the battle-fields around the capital. In 1850-51 he was chief engineer of the projected Tehuantepec Railroad; and in 1855-56 he was superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He was chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-62; also chief engineer of the construction of the defences of the national capital from September, 1862, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the field
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