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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 259 259 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 17 17 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1833 AD or search for 1833 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
sea-captain, devoted himself during the last eighteen years of his life (1823-1841) to the advocacy of the Peace cause, and was largely instrumental in establishing the American Peace Society in 1828. See his Memoir by John Hemmenway, Boston, 1872, and Mrs. Child's Letters from New York, 1st series, p. 212. Mr. Garrison addressed a sonnet to this great advocate (Lib. 1.39), but more intimate acquaintance led to the judgment, He is a good-natured man, but somewhat superficial (Ms., spring of 1833, to Henry E. Benson). in behalf of peace were frequently alluded to in the Journal, as they had been in the Philanthropist and Free Press; Mr. Ladd having visited and spoken in Newburyport while Mr. Garrison was editing the latter paper, and found in him a ready listener. Much space was devoted also to the movement with which, as has been already stated, he heartily sympathized, against carrying the mails on the Sabbath. His orthodoxy Ante, p. 84. betrayed itself in this and in other w
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
r—all these, says Garrison and his Times, p. 51. Oliver Johnson, make a picture never to be forgotten. It was a pretty large room. says Josiah Copley (in the Pittsburgh United Presbyterian of June 5, 1879), who visited it in the winter of 1832-33. but there was nothing in it to relieve its dreariness but two or three very common chairs and a pine desk in the far corner, at which a pale, delicate. and apparently over-tasked gentleman was sitting. . . . I never was more astonished. All my p fortnight later (October 15) he received from an eminent counsellor of the State of South Carolina (no doubt, Senator Hayne) a private communication to the same end, to which Mr. Otis made a long reply. First given to the public in the fall of 1833, through the Boston Advertiser. See, also, Niles' Register, 45.42, Sept. 14. He had by that time procured a copy of the Liberator, but had not ascertained the name of any person taking it, and concluded that its patronage must be extremely limite
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
elling, Dr. Gamaliel Bradford, Dr. Bradford was a graduate of Harvard College (1814), and from 1833 to the close of his life in 1839 was Superintendent of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Ab as preserved in the Lib. 2.155. records, looked to the preparation for the annual meeting in 1833 of reports on the foreign and domestic slave trade, on colonization, on the condition of the freeon Smith & Co., 1832), reprinted with other matter in a pamphlet published by Garrison & Knapp in 1833, called British Opinions of the American Colonization Society. The preface to this pamphlet statin's An Inquiry into the Merits of the American Colonization Society, etc. (London: J. & A. Arch, 1833). Viewed in this light, and not merely as literature, it might not extravagantly be ranked as thelowing the reprint in the Liberator, an edition in book form was put forth by Garrison & Knapp in 1833, and a fifth edition was published by Isaac Knapp as late as 1838. Still another edition bears t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. Garrison advises this lady as to opening a School for colored girls in Canterbury, Conn., and his comments on her consequent persecution expose him to fresh libel suits. He is sent by the New England A. S. Society on a mission to England, to collect funds for a Manual Labor School for cularly the five men whose names were printed in black letters—the magnates of the little village. Your remarks in the last Liberator were awfully Ms. Mar. 23, 1833. cutting, writes Henry Benson; and Miss Crandall herself interposed with a prudential consideration: Permit me to entreat you to handle the prejudices of the Ms. Mar. 19, 1833. people of Canterbury with all the mildness possible, as everything severe tends merely to heighten the flame of malignity amongst them. Soft words turn away wrath, but grievous words stir up anger. Mr. May and many others of your warmhearted friends feel very much on this subject, and it is our opinion that
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. He arrives on the eve of the passage of the bill abolishing slavery in the British West Indies, is cordially received by the abolition leaders, and has interesting and affecting interviews with Buxton, Wilberforce, and Clarkson. He exposes Elliott Cresson and the Colonization scheme in Exeter Hall and elsewhere, and secures a protest against the latter headed by Wilberforce, who shortly dies and is buried in Westminster Abbey. Garrison attendspective of time. On Saturday, the 18th of August, Mr. Garrison embarked from London in the packet-ship Hannibal, Capt. Hebard, for the United States. At the end of a week Portsmouth was reached, and farewell letters despatched Ms. Aug. 31, 1833, from Nath. Paul and Joseph Phillips. to his English friends, who had generously supplemented the deficiency of his travelling credit. Five weeks more must elapse The Hannibal left Portsmouth on Aug. 26, and reached New York on Sunday evening,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. Garrison finds a mob prepared for him on landing in New York, and aks, he gave a correct portrait of N. Y. Gazette, Oct. 3, 1833; Lib. 3.162. Garrison, whom he designated as a man who had coming the other way. The Commercial Advertiser Oct. 3, 1833; Lib. 3.161. confirmed this report: In regard to Wm. Lloyd he Evening Post could not credit the stories of Oct. 3, 1833; Lib. 3.162. threatened violence to Mr. Garrison: The mere tier, and first published in the Haverhill Gazette early in 1833, Ante, p. 332. though composed during the previous year:se. Done at Philadelphia, the 6th day of December, A. D. 1833. Of the three-score signers of the Declaration not one ization and in favor of immediate emancipation, obtained in 1833 to be prefixed to the forthcoming edition of the Rev. Amos ison to mention that he was the first person Appeal, ed. 1833. p. 224. who dared to edit a newspaper in which slavery was
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
oston by a madman who is in league with a man of the name of Walker, who has recommended the slaves to cut their masters' throats. A little later, encountering Captain Stuart, who had just returned from the United States, Thompson Lib. 3.50. was presented with copies of the Liberator and the Thoughts on Colonization, the perusal of which more than prepared him to extend a brother's welcome to the founder and representative of the New England Anti-Slavery Society on his reaching England in 1833. A shake of the hand by this madman turned the current London Breakfast to W. L. G. p. 47. of his life, and decided the character of his future occupations. The talents of George Thompson were such as would have insured him brilliant success at the bar, and he was strongly urged to enter the legal profession by such eminent members of it as Lord Brougham, Edmund Quincy writes to Mr. Garrison from Boston, Aug. 10, 1838: I have just heard part of a letter from Charles Sumner, in which