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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 259 259 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 17 17 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1833 AD or search for 1833 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
riage he had Seth, the grandfather of Major-General Edwin V. Sumner, who was an officer of the regular army, served in the Mexican War, commanded in Kansas during a part of the controversy between the free-state and the pro-slavery men, and bore a distinguished part in the war of the Rebellion. By the second marriage By the same marriage he had, as his thirteenth and last child, Jesse, who was the father of Harriot, the second wife of Nathan Appleton of Boston, a member of Congress in 1831-33, and again in 1842. It may be noted, that one of Mr. Appleton's daughters, by his first marriage, married Robert J. Mackintosh, who was the son of Sir James, the English publicist and historian; and another married Henry W. Longfellow, the poet. he had Job, his ninth child, who was the father of Charles Pinckney Sumner, and the grandfather of Charles Sumner. The following are reliable authorities concerning the genealogy of the Sumner Family: Memoir of Increase Sumner, Governor of Massachu
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
he case of Greenwood v. Curtis, 6 Mass. Rep. 362– 378 n. It is interesting to note, in Sheriff Sumner's correspondence, how nearly alike were the questions of 1833 and those of 1861, between the government and slavery. His relative, Edwin V. Sumner, a lieutenant of the regular army in 1833, and a major-general of volunteers 1833, and a major-general of volunteers in the Civil War, wrote to him from Fort Niagara, Jan. 11, 1833,— What think you of the nullifiers? Our affairs begin to assume a very gloomy appearance in that quarter. If South Carolina stood alone, there would be less cause of apprehension; but is there not every reason to fear that it will result in a controversy betwe Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama will sooner or later unite and bid defiance to the North. He added: In the course of this year, 1833, I trust we are to see whether we are a nation or a confederacy. He had before this, Jan. 20, 1830, written to Mr. Webster, acknowledging the receipt of a copy of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
July, by Simon Greenleaf, 1783-1853; practised law in Maine, 1806-1833; professor at Cambridge, 1833-1848. the author of the treatise on Th1833-1848. the author of the treatise on The Law of Evidence; the vacancy being filled during the intervening period by James C. Alvord, of Greenfield, a young lawyer of marked ability. reach the fair maturity of life. During the summer and autumn of 1833, while serving as librarian, Sumner prepared a catalogue of the librn the American Jurist. Jan., 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 263-268. In 1833, he contributed two articles to the American Monthly Review: Apri attracted by his manly presence and genial smile. In the autumn of 1833, Sumner invited George S. Hillard to repeat before the society a tem. Alvord took Mr. Ashmun's place as professor, but, in the summer of 1833, he also was taken very ill. During the weeks after the notice of thl, of Cornell University, who saw much of Sumner at Cambridge in 1832-33, writes: — He was a tall, thin, bent, ungainly law-student; h
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ve jurisprudence,—a department in which he excelled all his contemporaries. Removing to Paris in 1826, and naturalized as a French citizen in 1829, he founded, in 1833, the Revue Étrangere de Legislation et daEconomie Politique; the name of which was, in 1840, changed to the Revue Étrangere et Francaise de Legislation, de Jurisprhilosopher, particularly for his studies in morals and metaphysics. He translated into French the works of Thomas Reid, and Dugald Stewart's Moral Philosophy. In 1833 he became a Professor of Greek Literature and Philosophy, in the College of France, and in 1838 resigned his chair to become Librarian of the University. In 1831 the impression of remarkable talent. After Pellat, I heard, at the Sorbonne, a part of the lecture of Geruzez Nicolas Eugene Geruzez, 1799-1865. He was, from 1833 to 1852, the substitute of Villemain in the chair of Literature. His writings related mostly to the history of literature and eloquence. on some French author,—I <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
f six, besides Monsieur and Madame, my hosts. The breakfast was truly sumptuous: seldom, if ever, have I seen such a repast for dinner. There were certainly half a dozen wines, and a long retinue of the richest and subtlest dishes. M. Demetz, speaking of the culinary talent of the French, said at the dinner: Notre cuisine est la cuisine du monde. Among the guests was Michel Chevalier, M. Chevalier was born Jan. 13, 1806. After the Revolution of 1830, he became editor of the Globe. In 1833-35, under an appointment from Thiers, then Minister, he visited tile United States for the purpose of investigating our railroad system, and later published his Letters on North America, which had already appeared in the Journal des Debats. In 1840, he succeeded Rossi in the chair of Political Economy at the College of France. He is among the most eminent economists of his age, and the head of the free-trade school in his country. Sumner received many attentions from M. Chevalier, on his vi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
an Sir Charles Richard Vaughan, 1775-1849; Fellow of All Souls' College, Oxford; Secretary of Legation in Spain in 1810; Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain, 1815-16; to Switzerland in 1823; and to the United States, 1825-35 (with an absence, 1831-33). His friendly relations at Washington with Judge Story brought the latter into a correspondence with Mr. Justice Vaughan, a brother of Sir Charles. Story's Life and Letters. Sumner, while in England, was indebted to Sir Charles for many civilitid be thought quite indecorous in either of them to interfere by saying a word. You have asked about the characters of judges. I should not omit that of the Lord Chancellor. Charles Christopher Pepys, 1781-1851. He became Solicitor-General in 1833, Master of Rolls in 1834, Lord Chancellor in 1836, and a peer with the title of Baron Cottenham. He held the seal, with a brief interval, until June, 1850, when he resigned; having the same month been advanced in the peerage to the title of Visco