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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1835 AD or search for 1835 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 268 results in 240 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Lyman, 1835- (search)
Abbott, Lyman, 1835- Clergyman and editor; born in Roxbury, Mass., Dec. 18, 1835; third son of Jacob; was graduated at the University of the City of New York in 1853; was admitted to the bar there, and for a time practised in partnership with his brothers Benjamin Vaughan and Austin. Subsequently he studied theology with his uncle, John Stevens Cabot, and was ordained as a Congregational minister in 1860. He was secretary of the Freedmen's Commission in 1865-68; became editor of the Literary record in Harper's magazine, and conductor of the Illustrated Christian weekly; and for a time was associated with Henry Ward Beecher (q. v.) in the editorship of The Christian Union., In 1888 he succeeded Mr. Beecher as pastor of Plymouth Church, Brooklyn. In 1898 he resigned and took full editorial charge of The outlook, formerly The Christian Union. Among his publications is A dictionary of religious knowledge. See Indian problem, the. An Anglo-American understanding. Dr. Abbott i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Francis, 2nd 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Francis, 2nd 1835- Lawyer and historian; born in Boston, Mass., May 27, 1835; second son of Charles Francis, 1st; was graduated at Harvard College in 1856, and admitted to the bar two years afterwards. During the Civil War he served in the Union army, attaining the rank of brevet brigadier-general. He was appointed a member of the Board of Railway Commissioners of Massachusetts in 1869; and was president of the Union Pacific Railway Company in 1884-91. In 1895 he was elected president of the Massachusetts Historical Society. His publications include, Railroads, their origin and problems; Massachusetts, its historians and its history; Three episodes of Massachusetts history; Life of Charles Francis Adams; Richard Henry Dana, a biography, etc. The double anniversary, 1776 and 1863. On July 4. 1869, he delivered the following historical address at Quincy, Mass.: Six years ago, on this anniversary, we — and not only we who stood upon the scarred and fur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- Educator and historian; born in Derby, Vt., Jan. 24, 1835; was graduated at the University of Michigan. and continued his studies in Germany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published many monographs and papers in reviews, and Democracy and monarchy in France; Manual of Historical Literature; British orations; Christopher Columbus, his life and work, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Alexander, 1835- (search)
Agassiz, Alexander, 1835- Naturalist; born in Neuchatel, Switzerland, Dec. 17, 1835: son of Prof. Louis Agassiz; came to the United States in 1849; and was graduated at Harvard College in 1855, and at Lawrence Scientific School in 1857. He was curator of the Natural History Museum, in Cambridge, in 1874-85: has since been engaged in important zoological investigations; and became widely known by his connection with the famous Calumet and Hecla copper-mines. The University of St. Andrews conferred the honorary degree of Ll.D. upon him, April 2, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Edward Porter, 1835- (search)
Alexander, Edward Porter, 1835- Engineer; born in Washington, Ga., May 26, 1835; was graduated at the United States Military Academy, and commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Engineer Corps in 1857, resigned and entered the Confederate army in 1861; served with the Army of Northern Virginia from the beginning to the close of the war, attaining the rank of brigadier-general and chief of ordnance. In 1866-70 he was Professor of Mathematies and Engineering in the University of South Carolina; in 1871-92 engaged in railroad business; and in 1892-94 was a member of the Boards on Navigation of the Columbia River, Ore., and on the ship-canal between Chesapeake and Delaware bays. Subsequently he was engineer-arbitrator of the boundary survey between Costa Rica and Nicaragua.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Adelbert, 1835- (search)
Ames, Adelbert, 1835- Military officer; born in Rockland, Me., Oct. 31, 1835; was graduated at West Point in 1861; and for his gallant conduct in the Battle of Bull Run (1861) was brevetted major. He served in the campaigns on the Peninsula in 1862. At Chancellorsville he led a brigade, also at Gettysburg, in 1863, and before Petersburg, in 1864, he commanded a division. In the expedition against Fort Fisher, near the close of that year, he commanded a division of colored troops, and afterwards led the same in North Carolina. In the spring of 1865 he was brevetted major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general, U. S. A. In 1871 he was a representative of Mississippi in the United States Senate; was governor in 1874; and was appointed a brigadier-general of volunteers June 20, 1898, serving through the war with Spain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anthon, Charles, 1797-1867 (search)
Anthon, Charles, 1797-1867 Scholar and educator; born in New York, Nov. 19, 1797. His father, a surgeon-general in the British army, settled in New York soon after the Revolution. Charles graduated at Columbia College in 1815, was admitted to the bar, and in 1820 was made professor of languages in his alma mater. Professor Anthon was the author of many books connected with classical studies. He was made the head of the classical department of the college as successor of Professor Moore in 1835, having served as rector of the grammar-school of the college for five years. Professor Anthon was very methodical in his habits. He retired at ten o'clock and rose at four, and performed much of his appointed day's work before breakfast. By industry he produced about fifty volumes, consisting chiefly of the Latin classics and aids to classical study. All of his works were republished in England. His larger works are a Classical dictionary, and a Dictionary of Greek and Roman antiquities.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820- (search)
Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820- American reformer; born in South Adams, Mass., Feb. 15, 1820. She was of Quaker parent-age, and received her education at a Friends' school in Philadelphia. From 1835 to 1850 she taught school in New York. In 1847 she began her efforts in behalf of the temperance movement, making speeches and organizing societies; in 1852 she assisted in organizing the Woman's New York State Temperance Society. In 1854-55 she held conventions in each county in New York in behalf of female suffrage. She was a leader in the anti-slavery movement, and one of the earliest advocates of the coeducation of women. Greatly through her influence, the New York legislature, in 1860, passed the act giving married women the possession of their earnings, and the guardianship of their children. In 1868, with Mrs. E. C. Stanton and Parker Pillsbury, she began the publication of the Revolutionist, a paper devoted to the emancipation of women. In 1872 she cast test ballots at t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arista, Mariano, 1802- (search)
Arista, Mariano, 1802- A Mexican military officer; born at San Luis Potosi, July 26, 1802. Receiving a military education, he served in the Spanish army until June, 1821, when he joined the Mexican revolutionists. He rose rapidly to the rank of brigadier-general; and in June, 1833, he was made, by Santa Ana (q. v.), second in command of the Mexican army. Joining another leader in an unsuccessful revolt, he was expelled from Mexico, and came to the United States. In 1835 he returned, and was restored to his rank in the army, and made Judge of the Supreme Tribunal of War. He was taken prisoner by the French at Vera Cruz (Dec. 5, 1838), but was soon released on parole. In 1839 he became general-in-chief of the northern division of the army, and received the Cross of honor for defeating insurgents. Though only a military commander, he was for some time the real ruler of Mexico when Herrera was President in 1844. Commanding at the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca De La Palma (q.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
district. A new constitution was framed by a convention at Little Rock, Jan. 7, 1868, and was ratified by a small majority in March. On June 22, Congress declared Arkansas entitled to representation in that body, and the administration of the government was transferred to the civil authority. Population in 1890, 1,125,385; in 1900, 1,311,564. Territorial Governors of Arkansas.  Term of Office. James Miller1819 to 1825 George Izard1825 to 1829 John Pope1829 to 1835 William S. Fulton1835 to 1836 State Governors of Arkansas. James S. Conway1836 to 1840 Archibald Yell1840 to 1844 Samuel Adams1844 Thomas S. Drew1844 to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadley1871 to 1872 Elisha Baxter1872 to 1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H. Berry1883 to 1885 Simon P. Hugh
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