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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1835 AD or search for 1835 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
ctised his declamation in the groves and green fields on the outskirts of his native town. Old Maid's Hall, now a part of Oak Hill Cemetery, was one of his resorts for this purpose. The intimacy between him and Crocker waned after they separated and left Newburyport, the one to seek a journalistic career, and the other to enter a theological school; An acrostic addressed to William Goss Crocker, on his departure for Liberia, and signed G., on page 160 of the fifth volume of the Liberator (1835), gives evidence of their continued friendship, however. but that with Knapp, as will abundantly appear, was more enduring and of the highest importance. Though Lloyd was not, like Crocker, a communicant in the church, he was a constant attendant at its meetings, and had become, as his mother had fondly anticipated, a complete Baptist as to the tenets. He had never been baptized, himself, but he was yet zealous for Lib. 19.178. immersion as the only acceptable baptism; he believed in t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
e world. It was a favorite idea of Lundy's to establish a colony for the free blacks and emancipated slaves in Southern territory. So firm was his belief that Texas was the most appropriate region for it, that he subsequently (between 1831 and 1835) made three journeys thither, traversing the country, living there for months at a time, falling back on his saddler's trade for support when his funds gave out, incurring constant peril from disease or violence, yet laboring year after year, in season and out of season, to obtain a grant of land from the Mexican Government for his colony. In 1835 he succeeded in securing a grant of 138,000 acres, on condition that he should bring to it two hundred and fifty settlers with their families, and he returned to the United States to secure these; but the disturbances arising from the lawless Southern invasion of Mexico put an end to his scheme. His journeys had no other result than to make him the best informed man in the country in regard t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
sh it could be extensively read, but it will take a long time to get into circulation through the book-stores. If you will circulate 90 copies and send me 10, I will pay for the 100, and you may draw on me for the amount. You will send the 90 to whomsoever you think best. A part of them will be [well] placed in the hands of presidents and professors of colleges and seminaries, and in the reading-rooms of those institutions. On the other hand, Gerrit Smith's change was sudden, and not till 1835. (See, in Frothingham's Life, pp. 162-170, and Lib. 6.23, 26.) The list, too, would bear extension. For example, the Thoughts determined the life-work of the Rev. James Miller McKim, of Pennsylvania, and secured in him one of the most efficient and judicious advocates of the anti-slavery cause. (See p. 656 of Still's Underground railroad, and pp. 32, 33 of Proceedings of the American Anti-Slavery Society, Third Decade.) Its effect on George Thompson, of England, will be related hereafter.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
the steamboat, hoping I might arrive in season to take passage therein, and thus baffle the vigilance of the enemy— but the ship sailed in the morning, and I did not get here till the afternoon; consequently, I failed to accomplish my April 20. purpose. My only alternative, therefore, is, to return again to New York to-morrow evening, and stealthily get away, if April 23. possible, in the Liverpool packet Probably the Canada (see Abdy's Journal of a residence in the U. S. London, 1835, 1.1-14). that sails the next morning. Probably I shall not start in the ship, but go down the river in a pilot-boat and overtake her. My friends are full of apprehension and disquietude; but I cannot know fear. I feel that it is impossible for danger to awe me. I tremble at nothing but my own delinquencies, as one who is bound to be perfect, even as my heavenly Father is perfect. The second trip from New York to Philadelphia was, perhaps, made by the usual route, namely, by steamboa
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
in Maine The sinews and chords of his pugilist brain. A man who's made less than he might have, because He always has thought himself more than he was. Lowell's Fable for critics. who, naturally enough as a notorious Colonizationist, took a leading part in it, has left this blundering account in his Wandering Recollections of a somewhat busy life : As I happened to be going through New York, with my P. 401. wife, on our way to the Western country, and thence to Europe, in 1834, or 1835, I should say, I found myself one day in the Courier and Enquirer office, where, by the way, I first met with Mr. Bennett, who had just been secured for that paper, and Jas. Gordon Bennett. was there introduced to me by Colonel Webb. I was informed Jas. Watson Webb. that a meeting was called in the Park, by William Lloyd Garrison, for that very evening. After some talk, I consented to take a hand. It was arranged that we should all go to the meeting, and adjourn to Old Tammany, and t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
57, 158, 170, 174, 178; 5.10. Theological Seminary and the withdrawal of the students; nor the accession of James Gillespie Birney to the Lib. 4.129, 131, 157, 158. anticolonization ranks; First signified by a letter to the corresponding secretary of the Kentucky Colonization Society, dated July 15, 1834. Printed in pamphlet form by Garrison & Knapp in the same year. See, for Birney's general account of his change of mind, p. 76 of the 2d Annual Report of the American A. S. Society, 1835. nor the several anniversaries above referred to, and the attendant and subsequent mobs; nor the daily multiplication of anti-slavery societies; nor Judson's retributive defeat as candidate for the Lib. 4.63. Connecticut Legislature; nor Charles Stuart's arrival in Lib. 4.59, 79. America; nor Gerrit Smith's founding a manual-labor Lib. 4.27, 38. school at Peterboroa, for colored males. All these cheering signs of the times, following close upon the organization of the American Anti-
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. An Americas Union is formed by orthodox clernt home to write my valedictory, and Jan. 9, 1835. to advertise the world of the downfall of the acquiesced in slavery. Now first, in the year 1835, the progress of the agitation compelled the Noib. 6.27), was renewed at the annual meeting in 1835, on motion of Elizur Wright, Jr. (2d Ann. Reporhaving been appointed to meet, in the spring of 1835, at Richmond, Va., it appeared opportune to thein Boston who would assassinate Ms. Aug. 19, 1835. him in broad daylight. Did you know the state. 15, ante, p. 489, Boston Advertiser, Aug. 20, 1835. putting out an address to the public which wilold Cradle of Liberty, In the year of our Lord, 1835, and the fifty-ninth of the Declaration of Amerxpectation, and wait with great Ms. Aug. 24, 1835. impatience for the arrival of the mail this fohed. Father, thy will be done!(Lib. Sept. 19, 1835). Is not this Christ-like? The Southern cler[8 more...]<