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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1835 AD or search for 1835 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
t we could not be allowed to occupy the hall in the evening on any conditions, such was the excited state of the public mind. This announcement led to a most animated discussion. We refused, of course, to give any such guaranty, as that would be a strong inducement to the mob to do all the injury they could to the hall. Syracuse was held up to the infamy of the world, in terms of merited severity, as a town under mobocratic sway, worthy to be associated with Boston, New York, and Utica, in 1835. Finally, the requisition Ante, 1.490; 2.9, 40. was withdrawn, and we were allowed to continue our meetings through the day, but not in the evening. In the afternoon, Foster obtained a very respectful hearing in defence of his terrible charge against the Methodist Church, and produced an impression decidedly in his favor. He was followed by a pettifogging lawyer and editor, named Cummings, in reply, who kept the audience in a roar of laughter by his ridiculous nonsense and silly buffooner
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
the latter's Unitarian confrere, the Rev. Orville Dewey. This divine was at great pains to draw what Mr. Garrison termed a profligate distinction between Lib. 14.162. recognizing slavery as it already existed, and legalizing it anew by extension of the slave territory. Compare, in another denomination, this extract from a Phi Beta Kappa Address at Wesleyan College in 1850, by the Rev. D. D. Whedon: Nor may you marvel, friends, if I, who was once noted here as the apologist of slavery [in 1835, namely, when he composed A Counter Appeal to the Ministers and Members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the New England and New Hampshire Conferences,] can now present myself its stern assailant. For its existence I did, and would, apologize; but never for its extension. I would deal gently with the hereditary sin of its being; but I abhor the stupendous volitional crime of its propagandism (Whedon's Essays, Reviews, and discourses. New York, 1887, 1: 28). In other words, all these mo
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
ipation. Thus they were proved to be men destitute of principle, guided by a selfish expediency, loving the praises of men more than the praise of God. By way of illustration, Mr. Garrison cited the case of Ante, 1.480. Drs. Cox and Hoby, in 1835, whose attempted neutrality, in the interest of the paramount purpose of their mission, amounted to positive hostility to the American Anti-Slavery Society, and directly imperilled the life of George Thompson. The year 1835 was the most memorable1835 was the most memorable of any that has occurred for pro-slavery violence and lawlessness; and that was the year made equally memorable by the presence and recreancy of those English delegates. How much of this violence and lawlessness will be manifested during your sojourn here, wrote the Lib. 19.142. victim of the Boston mob to Father Mathew, remains to be seen; but no small amount, if coming events cast their shadows before. The second letter introduced a personal comparison: To shield you from censure
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
se the influence of the Garrisonians: he had seen its working Lib. 20.41. since 1835 [and longer, but he naturally remembered by Cf. ante, 2.59. landmarks of mob vient States, and withal would have the South start factories of her own. As in 1835, the attempt was made to cow the North Ante, 2.4. through the medium of its tras the anti-slavery agitation by force was again to be illustrated, in 1850 as in 1835, in the person of Mr. Garrison. He began the year in poor health, though still saving meetings, George Thompson revisited the country which had expelled him in 1835. Oct. 29, 1850; Lib. 20.174. He landed in Boston, the port of his covert and had be his reception now as an abolitionist, as a foreigner? Peleg Sprague had in 1835 malevolently bade him go Ante, p. 2.498. back and brave the wrath of English re that violence and Ante, p. 256. lawlessness would stalk the land in 1850 as in 1835, had been fulfilled; and the end was not yet. A pleasurable reminder of the e
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
of that voice whose echoes had reached them in the stirring tales of the nobles of earlier conversion. The rage, too, of opposition raises him into an object of universal attention. It is generally voted that he has not grown a day older since 1835, though the dissentients are not few. Then many scold, more laugh, at his snuff; but his vivacity, brilliancy, and variety of accomplishment in private life Thompson was a great mimic, and practised parlor magic. charm every one that has the goether with the best of Mr. Garrison's verse. The letter to Peleg Sprague was not omitted, Ante, 1.505. and the Appendix contained a portion of Sprague's Faneuil Ante, 1.496. Hall speech, the account of the Boston mob of October 21, Ante, 2.11. 1835, written by its victim, Thompson's letter addressed to him on the day following, and sundry proofs of the Ante, 1.297. character of the Colonization Society. The title-page bore these lines from Coleridge's Fears in Solitude : O my brethren
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
was the celebration of the twentieth anniversary of the Oct. 21, 1855. Boston mob in the very hall from which the Female Anti-Slavery Society had been expelled in 1835. Nothing it lacked, of solemnity or historic picturesqueness, but the presence of Mrs. Chapman, who was on the eve of embarking for America after a seven years repect, and naturally assuming the historical-biographical part of the appointed exercises, no wonder that Mr. Garrison spoke with good cheer of the contrast between 1835 and 1855, and found all the signs of the times encouraging, though admitting Lib. 25.174. that more than a million slaves are to be delivered who were not in exisquestion one word of his; but my heart asked my intellect, Are things so changed, after all? Is the Massachusetts of 1855 so transformed from the Massachusetts of 1835? Is State Street so utterly changed now from what it was when it poured forth its base-hearted myriads then? Is it true that all the hard work is done, no great
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
ublican Administration not more than against its own fears (fed by a thousand idle rumors) of slave insurrections; the pro-slavery and halting Republican North in panic striving to stave off the inevitable by making every concession to the Lib. 30.186, 190, 205; 31.5. Slave Power, beginning with the surrender of the Personal Liberty laws, and by pursuing abolitionists with mob violence. In Boston, the respectable progeny of the Dec. 3, 1860; Lib. 30.193-195, 198-201. respectable rioters of 1835 took possession of a meeting in Tremont Temple, commemorating John Brown's execution by its date, and discussing the trite question, How can American slavery be abolished?—a meeting, Lib. 30.186. needless to say, not called by Garrisonian abolitionists. Turned out of doors by the Mayor, it adjourned for the evening to the Belknap-Street (colored) Church, where the spirit of violence was still more rampant, at least at the close, when Mrs. Chapman was thought to have saved M. W. Chapman. Mr