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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1835 AD or search for 1835 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
h and an engine company, when under the statute it became his duty to read the riot act. In the latter part of his life the perplexities of his office annoyed him. He was too formal and punctilious, too reserved, and too little pliant to the ways of men to please the general public. His last appointment drew out some opposition, but his sterling worth overcame it. He participated in the controversy concerning Masonry, which was carried on with greater or less zeal during the decade of 1825-35. He co-operated with the leading opponents of the order in the State,—John Quincy Adams, Pliny Merrick, Benjamin F. Hallett, Henry Gassett, and Amasa Walker. He had been himself initiated, about 1799, when quite a young man, and had become a master-mason in 1802. A year later he was the eulogist of the order, in a poem and an address before the Grand Lodge of the State. In 1806, however, he discontinued his attendance on its meetings. In 1829, he renounced his connection with it. The sam
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
ht him into personal relations with Rufus Choate, then a member of the House of Representatives. He left Washington, after a month's sojourn, with little expectation of ever seeing the city again, with an increased love of his chosen profession, and with a strong aversion to politics. On his way home he passed some days in Philadelphia, where he seems to have enjoyed himself heartily; dining one day at the house of Joseph R. Ingersoll, 1786-1868. Mr. Ingersoll was a member of Congress, 1835-37, and again 1842-49. and Minister to England, 1850-53. in a large and splendid company, and passing his evenings with the family of Mr. Peters. He left the city with a lively impression of the hospitality of the people. One of the daughters of Mr. Peters pleased him much with her excellent imitation of Miss Kemble's acting. With another daughter, then quite a young girl, he talked much concerning her studies, and afterwards sought, by his letters, to foster her literary inclinings. Her
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
his papers is an elaborate opinion, written in 1835, which reviews at length the authorities on a qwhich is a part of Vol. IX. of the series. In 1835-36, he prepared the indexes to the two volumes y Jurisprudence. Some literary work planned in 1835 was not executed,--a condensed series of Englisbrief notices of books. In the winter of 1834-35, he was announced for a lecture in a course delical life had once been in his thoughts. In 1835, he took a share in a speculation,—his only venDr. Channing's book on Slavery was published in 1835. and his moral inspiration, the world will evervely in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. In 1835, he became professor of History and Political Ecquaintance during his visit to this country in 1835. 1783-1862. Dr. Nikolaus H. Julius. He livednds. He corresponded with George Gibbs, who in 1835 passed some time in Paris, where through Sumner their law-partnership. A single interview, in 1835, between Longfellow and Sumner, in Felton's roo[10 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
une 1, 1802, and died in Athens, Nov. 24, 1859. He accompanied, in 1828, the younger Champollion to Egypt; was chosen, in 1835, Guizot's substitute (suppleant) in the professorship of History, and in 1848 Professor of Egyptology, in the College of Fe performers. Grisi, Malibran, Tamburini, Lablache, Rubini, and Ivanhoff were united in a concert at Stafford House, in 1835. Greville's Memoirs, ch. XXVIII.; July 15, 1835. Their voices, attuned to such various and subtle harmonies, entered the n newly Translated and Explained (Institutes de Justinien nouvellement Traduites et Expliquees), which, first published in 1835, had reached an eighth edition in 1851. He was also a contributor to the Revue Étrangere in the midst of a lecture on thex thought the greater part of the books of the present day were absolutely good for nothing. He excepted Toullier 1752-1835; author of a work in fourteen volumes on The French Civil Law according to the Order of the Code Napoleon. and Pardessus;
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
x, besides Monsieur and Madame, my hosts. The breakfast was truly sumptuous: seldom, if ever, have I seen such a repast for dinner. There were certainly half a dozen wines, and a long retinue of the richest and subtlest dishes. M. Demetz, speaking of the culinary talent of the French, said at the dinner: Notre cuisine est la cuisine du monde. Among the guests was Michel Chevalier, M. Chevalier was born Jan. 13, 1806. After the Revolution of 1830, he became editor of the Globe. In 1833-35, under an appointment from Thiers, then Minister, he visited tile United States for the purpose of investigating our railroad system, and later published his Letters on North America, which had already appeared in the Journal des Debats. In 1840, he succeeded Rossi in the chair of Political Economy at the College of France. He is among the most eminent economists of his age, and the head of the free-trade school in his country. Sumner received many attentions from M. Chevalier, on his visit
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
the whole time? Peel 1788-1850. Peel was at this period the leader of the Conservatives. In 1835 he had been succeeded by Lord Melbourne as Prime-Minister; afterwards, in 1841, he succeeded Lordand Powers; entered Parliament in 1828; Solicitor-Genera in 1829; Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1834-35 and 1841-46; and, in 1852, Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, with the title of Baron St. Leonards.Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain, 1815-16; to Switzerland in 1823; and to the United States, 1825-35 (with an absence, 1831-33). His friendly relations at Washington with Judge Story brought the latt from 1830 to 1834; Secretary of State for the Colonies in 1834; Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1835 to September, 1839, when he was appointed Comptroller-General of the Exchequer. He was made a pech is conceded to Follett Sir William Webb Follett, 1798-1845. He was elected to Parliament in 1835, 1837, and 1841; was Solicitor-General, 1834-35, under Sir Robert Peel, and again in 1841, and be
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
a fourth,—John A. Murray, the present Lord-Advocate of Scotland. John Archibald Murray was in Parliament from 1832 to 1835; succeeded Francis Jeffrey, in 1834, as Lord-Advocate, and, losing the office in a few months, resumed it in 1835, and was1835, and was raised to the bench in 1839 as a Lord of Session. He died March 7, 1859, in his eighty-first year, at his residence on Great Stuart Street, Edinburgh. Save Brougham, he was the last survivor of that company of men who distinguished the society of . Labouchere, Henry Labouchere, 1798-1869. He was a member of Parliament from 1826 to 1859, became Privy Councillor in 1835, and was Vice-president of the Board of Trade from 1835 to 1839, and again from 1847 to 1852; Chief Secretary for Ireland 1835 to 1839, and again from 1847 to 1852; Chief Secretary for Ireland from 1846 to 1847; Colonial Secretary from 1855 to 1858, and was raised to the peerage as Baron Taunton in 1859. His second wife, to whom he was married in 1852, was Lady Mary Matilda Georgiana, a daughter of the sixth Earl of Carlisle, and sister o