hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for 1835 AD or search for 1835 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
Mr. Bowditch's office, He so calls the Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company, which is substantially a trust company, a part of whose profits go to the uses of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Mr. Ticknor was a Director from 1827 to 1835, Vice-President from 1841 to 1862, and wrote an important Annual Report in 1857. He was a Trustee of the Massachusetts General Hospital—no sinecure — from 1826 to 1830. His connection with the Athenaeum and the Primary School Board have been menber of the Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society, whose funds go to support widows and children of deceased clergymen, of various sects, mostly, of course, Orthodox or Evangelical. In this he labored actively, was Treasurer from 1831 to 1835, and in 1841-42; Vice-President, 1861-64; Chairman of Committee on Appropriations for several years, and placed on almost all committees charged with important duties. He resigned from it entirely in 1864. He was Treasurer, for two or three year
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
y decided against it. This portrait is mentioned by Lockhart; and Mrs. Lockhart's opinion of it—given to Mr. Ticknor in 1835—will be found in its place. Before leaving the subject of Mr. Ticknor's home we will give one more short description,—for his health. His periods of actual service in Mr. Ticknor's family amounted to twenty years. While they were in Europe—1835-38–John fell into intemperate habits, and on their return could not, at first, be taken back; but one day he was summoned spitable tastes and social habits made his house the constant scene of a friendly and intellectual life. At this time—1826-35—a supper at nine o'clock in the evening naturally followed the early three-o'clock dinner then customary, and such suppers,on a fair exchange, and if his guest had anything to say, he was sure to have an opportunity. Miss Edgeworth wrote, in 1835, After a visit made by Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor at Edgeworthtown. to a friend of Mr. Ticknor, thus:— I have be
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
est one extant, and that nothing equals it except Chantrey's bust; so that I am sure of it now, for she volunteered the remark, with all her characteristic simplicity and directness. The evening we spent very agreeably indeed, in a party collected to meet us at Mrs. Lister's. Mrs. Thomas Lister,—afterwards Lady Theresa,—sister to Lord Clarendon. After Mr. Lister's death she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of English character; the beautiful and unpretending Lady James Graham;. . .