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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 278 278 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 40 40 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 39 39 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 35 35 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 24 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 23 23 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 17 17 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1837 AD or search for 1837 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
ept., 1838, and a few months later Hyperion and The Voices of the Night. Dr. Lieber visited Boston to superintend the publication of the Political Ethics. Motley was writing Morton's Hope. Greenleaf was gathering the materials for a treatise upon The Law of Evidence. Story was in the full tide of authorship, writing and printing The Law of Agency, and revising Equity Pleadings and other works. The period of financial depression,—one of the most remarkable in our history,—which began in 1837, still continued. The failure of some Boston banks had spread unusual distrust. Few local improvements were in progress; but it was thought worthy of record at the time that around the Common had been built a sidewalk, which, as a much-frequented promenade, was called The Lovers' Chase. The domestic life of Sumner's friends underwent changes. Cleveland and Felton were now both married. The former was living at Pine Bank, near Jamaica Pond, and the latter in a new house he had built at
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
in poverty. To him, London and its mighty maze of society are nothing; neither he nor his writings are known. Young Milnes Richard Monckton Milnes was born in 1809. He supported liberal measures as a Member of Parliament for Pontefract from 1837 to 1863, when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Houghton. His contributions to literature, in prose and poetry, have been miscellaneous. In 1875 he visited the United States. He is widely known for his genial qualities as host and friend. went his first circuit as judge in company with Bosanquet, who taught his Lordship how to wear his robes, and which of the various robes to assume on certain days. Next is Coltman, Thomas Coltman, 1781-1849; a judge of the Common Pleas from 1837 until his death. Sumner was invited at different times to dine at his house, 6 Hyde Park Gardens. whose appointment astonished everybody, and is said to have been a job of Brougham. He was of the Northern circuit, and a friend of Brougham. He
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ved to hear that her friends had fallen off from her. It was her misfortune to be so situated as to feel obliged to write a book. Society in America, published in 1837, and Retrospect of Western Travel, published in 1838. I doubt if a person who has mingled in society in any country can write a book in the spirit of truth withoute was remarkable at Cambridge for his mathematical powers. He made commercial law his specialty; was counsel of the Bank of England; was elected to Parliament, in 1837, for Carlow; appointed a judge of the Exchequer in March, 1839, and of the Common Pleas in November of that year; he resigned in 1855, on account of ill-health; anhe Western Circuit, and a very pleasant fellow, whom I know intimately. Erle William Erle was born in 1793; was returned to Parliament by the city of Oxford in 1837; became a judge of the Common Pleas in 1844, and of the Queen's Bench in 1846; Chief-Justice of the Common Pleas in 1859, and resigned in 1866. See reference to h
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
d to exist by the award at Geneva. I see pretty often. She has been consistently kind to me; and though circumstances have made me somewhat independent of her civilities, yet I feel grateful to her, and am glad to confess that I owe to her several attentions. She is much attached to our country and to many in it, and would be grieved to hear that her friends had fallen off from her. It was her misfortune to be so situated as to feel obliged to write a book. Society in America, published in 1837, and Retrospect of Western Travel, published in 1838. I doubt if a person who has mingled in society in any country can write a book in the spirit of truth without giving great offence. That she wrote hers influenced only by a love of truth, I am persuaded. I have seen and heard nothing in London which should shake the confidence of any of her friends in her; and I say it without making allusions to persons or things, because I have understood that some reports to the contrary have reached
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ner. His writings have related not only to Italian literature, but also to American history and biography of the period of the Revolution. He was Consul at Rome, 1837-45, afterwards Professor of Modern Languages in Brown University, and later a professor in Cornell University. From Rome he made two excursions,—one to Tivoli,n, for which the artist received a commission in 1832, cost him four years of active labor, and was not shipped from Italy till Oct., 1840. The Rescue, designed in 1837, was completed in 1851. Greenough's Essays, with a Memoir by H. T. Tuckerman, were published after his death. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 247-275. I like in of Franklin, of Marquis Capponi, &c. I have seen a good deal of Powers. Hiram Powers, 1805-73. He was born in Vermont; removed to Cincinnati; went to Italy in 1837; exhibited his Eve in 1838; and soon after executed the Greek Slave. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 276-294. He is very pleasant and agreeable. His busts are t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
Two hundred, I said; but that is antiquity with us. I regret much that Mr. Wheaton Henry Wheaton, 1785-1848; author of The Elements of International Law, and of The History of the Law of Nations. Sumner had met him in Paris, in the winter of 1837-1838. He paid a tribute to Mr. Wheaton, at the time of his death. Works, Vol. II. pp 63-73. is not here. He is passing the winter in Paris. He is at the head of our diplomacy in Europe, and does us great honor: the Princess William spoke of hpe you see a good deal of Mr. Kenyon; his conversation must be interesting to you. He is a lover of the fine arts, and, I doubt not, a patron of them. Fay, Theodore S. Fay, born in New York, Feb. 10, 1807; Secretary of Legation at Berlin, from 1837 to 1853, and Minister—resident at Berne, Switzerland, from 1853 to 1861. He is the author of books of travel, romances, and poems, and resides in Germany. He dedicated to Sumner his novel, Hoboken, published in 1841. the Secretary here, is a ver
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
good breeding as well as good morals; but he did not accept the rule of ethics on which many good people now insist, —that, for example and self-discipline, one ought to abstain from what is very liable to abuse. He seasoned his food with hock and claret, always however with moderation; but these he never took except at meals, and rigidly abstained from the violent drinks. From the political controversy involving legislation for the suppression of intemperance, which beginning as early as 1837 has continued ever since, he kept entirely aloof. In January and February, 1841, Sumner made a visit of three or four weeks to New York and Philadelphia. In New York he was the guest of his brother Albert, then newly married, and living on Bond Street. He was also cordially received by Chancellor Kent, and enjoyed much the society of the Misses Ward, —the Three Graces of Bond Street,—of whom one was to become the wife of his friend, Dr. Howe; another, of his friend Crawford; and the third<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
cause was grand. If I had been in the House, I should have been proud to fight under his banners. He has rallied tile North against the South; has taught them their rights, and opened their eyes to the bullying (I dislike the word as much as the thing) of the South. I wish you could extricate yourself from that coil. To Rev. Dr. William E. Channing, Boston. 4 Court Street, March 10, 1842. my dear Sir,—I am now able to send you the volume of documents containing the correspondence of 1837, on the subject of slaves thrown upon British islands. Allow me to call your attention to document 216, pp. 3-11, where Mr. Forsyth states the claim of the American Government; pp. 13-15, the answer of Lord Palmerston to this claim; pp. 25-28, a further answer of Lord Palmerston, embodying the English side in distinct and truly honorable terms; pp. 28-35, Mr. Stevenson's argument to support the slave-owner; pp. 43-45, a most interesting note from Lord Palmerston, assigning reasons why the En
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
his return from Europe. The Somers, a brig-of-war of the United States, sailed front New York upon a voyage to the coast of Africa, on Sept. 12, 1842, under the command of Alexander Slidell Mackenzie. The Mackenzie was added to his name, in 1837, by an act of the Legislature of New York. He was a popular author; and among his books are A Year in Spain, and biographies of Commodores Perry and Decatur. He died in 1848. Her crew consisted largely of apprentice boys, whom she had received fnt. Sumner reprinted it in his Works, Vol. IV. pp. 314, 315. Mr. Chandler writes:— I readily comply with your request for some personal reminiscences of Charles Sumner, and for my impressions of his early career as a lawyer. It was in 1837, when my name was entered as a student in the office of Theophilus Parsons at No. 4 Court Street. I had previously been in the Law School at Cambridge, and knew of Sumner by his reputation, which was very high there. I did not know him personally
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
ient, ever-wakeful police; and I believe that such a police has been long required in our country. But the militia, composed of youth of undoubted character, though of untried courage, is clearly inadequate for this purpose. No person who has seen them in an actual riot can hesitate in this judgment. See remarks concerning an efficient police, ante, Vol. II. p. 314. Sumner, in a note to this passage in the early editions of his oration, stated, with reference to the Broad Street riot of 1837 (ante, Vol. I. p. 162), that he had been on the ground and in the very houses, the scene of the riot, for an hour previous to the appearance of the militia, and that the riot had then ceased. This passage of the oration alone sufficiently showed that he was not a non-resistant. But to meet the criticism which it encountered in this regard, he made a formal disclaimer in his letter of July 10, when forwarding a copy of his oration to the city government in compliance with their request:—