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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
ern members theatrically left the House of Lib. 7.211. Representatives in a body when William Slade, of Vermont, presenting a petition for the abolition of slavery in the District, moved (the gag-rule having again lapsed) its reference to the proper committee, with instructions to report a bill; that, after an excited caucus, a fresh gag Called Patton's, after the mover, a Virginian. It forbade even the reading of the petitions. It was summarily adopted by the previous question on Dec. 21, 1837. Lib. 8.15, 9.30. was hastily imposed for the new session; and that Calhoun introduced in the Senate resolutions declaring the Lib. 8.3, 7, 11, 13, 14. suppression of the anti-slavery agitation a Government duty in the interest of domestic tranquillity, and opposition to the increase of slave territory an attempt to impair the equality of the States under the Constitution, as in effect disfranchising the slaveholding States. In these sentiments of his old opponent Ex-President Jackso
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
and a rebuke, like a jest. So does the patronizing repetition of the idea a few periods later: I am not discouraged by the fact that this great truth Lib. 6.206. [the unutterable worth of every human being] has been espoused most earnestly by a party which numbers in its ranks few great names. . . . The less prosperous classes furnish the world with its reformers and martyrs. These, however, from imperfect culture, are apt to narrow themselves to one idea, At this very moment (Dec. 21, 1837) the Quaker Charles Marriott was writing from Hudson, N. Y., to Mr. Garrison: We are sorry to hear of the indisposition of our dear sisters Grimke at our kind friend Samuel Philbrick's. They have sown much good seed on other subjects besides abolition. The charge that abolitionists are persons of but one idea is pretty well passed off (Ms.) to fasten their eyes on a single evil, to lose the balance of their minds, to kindle with a feverish enthusiasm. Let such remember that no man shou