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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 219 219 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 45 45 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 41 41 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 23 23 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 20 20 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 14 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley. You can also browse the collection for 1838 AD or search for 1838 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 13: the Jeffersonian. (search)
to engage in other labors. He wrote, as occasion offered, for various periodicals. The Daily Whig he supplied with its leading article for several months, and in 1838 undertook the entire editorial charge of the Jeffersonian, a weekly paper of the campaign description, started at Albany on the third of March, and continuing in ell read it. But, according to the subsequent explanation of the Tribune, it was established on the impulse of the whig tornado of 1837, to secure a like result in 1838, so as to give the Whig party a Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Senate, Assembly, U. S. Senator, Congressmen, and all the vast executive patronage of the State, theattle with the bed-bugs of the cabin, or the politicians of the hurricane-deck, he hurried off to new duties at the office of the Jeffersonian. The Albany boat of 1838 was a very different style of conveyance from the Albany boat of the present year of our Lord. It was, in fact, not much more than six times as elegant and comfo
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 16: the Tribune and Fourierism. (search)
Chapter 16: the Tribune and Fourierism. What made Horace Greeley a Socialist the hard winter of 1838 Albert Brisbane the subject broached series of articles by Mr. Brisbane begun their effect cry of mad dog discussion between Horace Greeley and Henry J. Raymond how it arose abstract of it in a conversational form. The editor of the Tribune was a Socialist years before the Tribune came into existence. The winter of 1838 was unusually severe. The times were hard, fuel and food were dear, many thousands of men and women were out of employment, and there was general distress. As the cold months wore slowly on, the sufferings of the poor became so aggravated, and the number of the unemployed increased to such a degree, that the ordinary means were inadequate to relieve even those who were destitute of every one of the necessaries of life. Some died of starvation. Some were frozen to death. Many, through exposure and privation, contracted fatal diseases. A la