Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for January, 1838 AD or search for January, 1838 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
David Hoffman's Anthony Grumbler; Oct., 1837, Vol. XVIII. pp. 119, 120. and The Judgments of Sir Edward Sugden. Jan., 1838, Vol. XVIII. pp. 328-334. As will be seen by reference to these articles, Sumner's tastes led him to write upon au commission. In 1837, Sumner contributed to the North American Review an article on Francis J. Grund's Americans, Jan., 1838, Vol. XLVI. pp. 106-126. In sending the article to the editor, Dr. Palfrey, he wrote, Nov. 25, 1837, The whole has beessistant, Oct., 1837, Vol. XLV. pp. 502-504; David Hoffman's Anthony Grumbler, pp. 482-504, and Lieber's Hermeneutics, Jan. 1838, Vol. XLVI pp. 300-301. In the Daily Advertiser, Aug. 24, 1835, he published a brief notice of a recent publication byermeneutics, Sumner published the Political Hermeneutics in the American Jurist, Oct. 1837, Vol. XVIII. pp. 37-101. Jan. 1838, Vol. XVIII. pp. 281-294. and Political Ethics. All these were topics of correspondence between them. Sumner furnis
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. This memoir, for the period of Sumner's absence from the country, must be confined chiefly to selections from his letters, and a journal which he began on the voyage and continued nearly four months. The journal begins thus:— Dec. 25, 1837.—Christmas. It is now seventeen days since I left New York for Havre in the ship Albany, Captain Johnston. Described in a letter of Sumner to Judge Story, Dec. 25, as a man of science and veracity. My passage had been taken, and my bill on the Rothschilds in Paris obtained, on the 7th December. On that day dined with a pleasant party at Mrs. Ledyard's, Mrs. Susan Ledyard, 53 Crosby Street; a friend of Judge Story, and the daughter of Brockholst Livingston, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1806-23. She died March 7, 1864; surviving her husband, Benjamin Ledyard, more than half a century.— the last dinner of my native land. Lef
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. During his first week in Paris, Sumner found no time to continue his journal. In this hasty diary, he wrote, a few weeks later, there is no memorial of my first week. Suffice it to say that I was kept in such an intoxicating whirl by the novelty which every thing had for my eyes, and every moment of my time was so intensely occupied, that I found not a fraction for this record. Of the letters which I brought to Paris I presented but few, feeling my utter incompetence for any French intercourse from my ignorance of the language. His first call was upon Foelix, Jean Jacques Gaspard Foelix, 1791-1853. He was born in the Electorate of Treves, and began, in 1814, the practice of the law at Coblentz. Upon the transfer of the Rhenish provinces from France to Germany, which soon followed, he had occasion to deal with questions involving a conflict between German law and the French code. He was thus led to t<