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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
liberal, enlightened, and yet practical jurist, and sound in constitutional law. Need I say that no man fills this space in our eyes like yourself? So make all your acquisitions, my dear friend, bear on this subject; keep always in mind that you are to occupy an additional chair with us, as our colleague in the great and honorable work, practising also in the courts in the more important causes, and in due time hasten home to the station we are quietly endeavoring to prepare for you In Jan., 1839, Judge Story said in conversation that he and Greenleaf should try to have Sumner in the Law School soon after his return; that the wish which lay nearest and dearest to his heart was to leave the Law School in good hands, and that he desired to have Sumner and Hillard succeed himself and Greenleaf. Again, Jan. 18, 1839:— When you ask me if we do still think it would have been better for you to have stayed at home, you put a difficult question. You have indeed seen a bright page
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ck.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. Letters. To George S. Hillf a dear child. The article in the last number, on Railroads, Jan. 1839, Vol. LXIII. pp. 1-60, Railroads in Ireland. which contains the ited States, is by Sir Francis Head; and the political article Jan. 1839, Vol. LXIII. pp. 223-277, Political Affairs. at the end is by Crd the brilliant article by Lord Brougham on Foreign Relations. Jan., 1839, Vol. LXVIII., pp. 495-537,—Foreign Relations of Great Britain. t. It is supposed that Maule will have it. Bolland resigned in Jan., 1839; Maule, who was appointed in his place in March, was transferred rticle on Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella is in that Review for Jan., 1839, Vol. LXIV. p. 1-58. He proved to be a less friendly critic thansight with. the author of the article in the Edinburgh Review. Jan., 1839, Vol. LXVIII. pp. 376-405. I met him at a dinner at Adolp
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
of the Latin poet, which was published in 1849, with a dedication to his friend, Lord Lansdowne. is by Milman. Poor man, he is now in great distress, on account of the illness of a dear child. The article in the last number, on Railroads, Jan. 1839, Vol. LXIII. pp. 1-60, Railroads in Ireland. which contains the ridiculous remarks on the United States, is by Sir Francis Head; and the political article Jan. 1839, Vol. LXIII. pp. 223-277, Political Affairs. at the end is by Croker. I hJan. 1839, Vol. LXIII. pp. 223-277, Political Affairs. at the end is by Croker. I have just read an article on Lockhart's Scott, written by Cooper, in the Knickerbocker, which was lent me by Barry Cornwall. I think it capital. I see none of Cooper's faults; and I think a proper castigation is applied to the vulgar minds of Scott and Lockhart. Indeed, the nearer I approach the circle of these men the less disposed do I find myself to like them. Scott is not sans reproche; and Lockhart seems without a friend. Of course, I see the latter often. Sometimes we shake hands whe
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
ve not time to write you. A diary has just been brought to light, kept by the vicar of the church at Stratford-on-Avon during the time of Shakspeare, and in which the name of Shakspeare is several times mentioned. What is said of him I do not know. One of our guests to-night was Dr. Severn, in whose hands the manuscript has been placed, and who will edit it. You will doubtless read the Edinburgh Review just published, and the brilliant article by Lord Brougham on Foreign Relations. Jan., 1839, Vol. LXVIII., pp. 495-537,—Foreign Relations of Great Britain. The epigram is given in a note to page 508, where it was first made public. Admire, I pray you, the epigram by Johnny Williams on Napoleon. After reading it, I took down the Greek Anthology, and compared it with the famous one on Themistocles and with several others, and I must say that I think Williams's the best; it is a wonderful feat in the Greek language. Lord B. repeated it to me at table, before it appeared in print