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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
arson. Is it possible you killed any thing on purpose? Did you think of Mr. Winkle? Did you remember Mr. Tupman's shooting a partridge by accident? That unfortunate rabbit will haunt you as long as you live, if you are indeed guilty of his blood. I think we must have a series of papers after the manner of Pickwick, describing the adventures of the Club; and it is plain that you must be the travelling committee, to say nothing of being our great oracle on matters of sport. Again, Jan. 23, 1839:— You can hardly imagine the joy your friends feel at the brilliant reception you have had in England. They have no forebodings of evil from all this. On the contrary, they have the most entire confidence in the firmness of your character and the goodness of your heart; and they anticipate your return with the richest treasures from the Old World, with your best tastes increased, your knowledge enlarged, your resolution to do good in your generation strengthened, and with such s
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ived in St. James Place, London, looking into the Green Park. His courtesy and hospitality have been commemorated by many visitors from the United States. Jan. 23, 1839. I see, by casting my eyes back, that I commenced the last sheet in praise of London. I feel in a mood quite the reverse to-day, and have so felt for severd regards to Mrs. Greenleaf, and thanks for her letter. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor William Whewell, London. 2 Vigo Street, Jan. 23, 1839. dear Mr. Whewell,—I am so knocked up with a cold that I shall not venture to your dinner to-day. Give me my own crystal weather, rather than your murky, fe hope of renewing it by welcoming you or any of your friends to America. Believe me ever very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Judge Story. London, Jan. 23, 1839. my dear Judge,—In my notes about the judges, I broke off without giving you the barons of the Exchequer. The successor of Allan Park has at last been appo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
Jan. 23, 1839. I see, by casting my eyes back, that I commenced the last sheet in praise of London. I feel in a mood quite the reverse to-day, and have so felt for several days. I again have a dismal cold. Give me the freezing, crystal weather of New England, rather than these murky, foggy days, freighted with disease and death. Three cruel colds in the space of two months,—the worst that have ever befallen me—admonish me to hasten nearer to the sun. I shall be off for Italy. But you will be glad to hear of the poet of this fair country. I believe I have often written you about Rogers. Of course, I have seen him frequently in society; never did I like him till I enjoyed his kindness at breakfast. As a converser Rogers is unique. The world, or report, has not given him credit enough for his great and peculiar powers in this line. He is terse, epigrammatic, dry, infinitely to the point, full of wisdom, of sarcasm, and cold humor. He says the most ill-natured things, and