Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for March, 1839 AD or search for March, 1839 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. Sixteen months passed between Sumner's parting with his friends in Boston and his leaving England for the Continent; and a reference to matters of public and personal interest occurring at home may be fitly included in this narrative. At a meeting held in Faneuil Hall, on the day he sailed, Dr. Channing, Hillard, and George Bond denounced the murder of Lovejoy, the anti-slavery editor; and Wendell Phillips began his career as an orator by his reply to James T. Austin, a defender of the deed. Pennsylvania Hall, then recently erected by the abolitionists in Philadelphia, was burned by a pro-slavery mob. Dr. Channing was replying to Henry Clay's defence of slavery. Letter to Jonathan Phillips, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and the<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. Letters. To George S. Hillard, Boston. Stratford-on-Avon, Jan. 6, 1839. dear Hillard,—My birthday in the birthplace of Shakspeare! During the forenoon I have wandered round this little town, in company with my kind host. I have been into the low room in the ancient building where Shakspeare is said to have first seen the light. I asked nry Maule, 1788-1858. He was remarkable at Cambridge for his mathematical powers. He made commercial law his specialty; was counsel of the Bank of England; was elected to Parliament, in 1837, for Carlow; appointed a judge of the Exchequer in March, 1839, and of the Common Pleas in November of that year; he resigned in 1855, on account of ill-health; and was placed in the Privy Council, in which he served upon the Judicial Committee. Humor was one of his marked personal characteristi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. Changing the plan of his journey, in which a visit to Germany was to follow his visit to England, Sumner turned towards Italy, and crossed the Channel, by way of Dover and Boulogne, on the night of March 22. During four weeks in Paris, he renewed his intercourse with friends At this, or during the latter part of his previous, visit to Paris, he made the acquaintance of Alexis de Tocqueville. from whom he parted the year before; and was kindly received by Lord Granville, then British ambassador, to whom he had been commended by Lord Morpeth. He also saw much of Lord Brougham, James Watson Webb, already editor of the New York Courier and Enquirer, since Minister to Brazil, was then in Paris. He had taken much interest in the North-eastern Boundary question, and had, in elaborate articles, maintained in his journal the title of the United States to the disputed territory. He was, together with Brougham and Sumner, pr