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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 279 279 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 90 90 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 48 48 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 37 37 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 24 24 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1840 AD or search for 1840 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
ervices to Mr. Garrison were inestimable, her co-operation with him perfect; and on her, more than on any other woman, the conduct of the cause rested. She was baptized into it in 1834, became the soul of the Boston Female A. S. Society, and from 1840 her administrative energy maintained the organ of the American A. S. Society, and so virtually the Society itself. She was, in her Right and Wrong series (1836-40), the chronicler of a critical epoch, and in countless other ways her pen was effec40), the chronicler of a critical epoch, and in countless other ways her pen was effectively employed, both in prose and in verse, in the Liberator, the Liberty Bell, the Standard, etc. She was born in 1806; her husband, Henry Grafton Chapman, in 1804. He was the son of Henry and Sarah Greene Chapman of Boston. The elder Chapman was the only one of those then reckoned the Boston merchants par excellence to make the anti-slavery cause his own: his wife paid, through the Boston Female A. S. Society, the counsel fee in the Med case (see hereafter). Both Mrs. M. W. Chapman and her
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
nt! Not a word about the object for which the Chapel was erected—not a syllable, either in the sermon or prayers, about the poor slave! If the mob element in Boston had learned nothing in three years, the city authorities had. Mayor Eliot found Samuel A. Eliot. all the law he wanted for calling out the militia and furnishing them with ball cartridges, though, as we are told, there was no statute authority . . . to issue Garrison Mob, p. 56. orders directly to the militia until the year 1840. Thanks to his prompt action on May 24, the New England Anti-Slavery Convention met without disturbance at the Marlboroa Chapel on May 30, with the venerable Seth Lib. 8.90, 91. Sprague, of Duxbury (the father of Peleg Sprague), in the chair, and a remarkable attendance on the part of the clergy. We must pass over its doings, except the unanimous adoption of a resolution, moved at the beginning by Oliver Johnson, that women as well as men be invited to become members and participate in the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. The nomination of Birney and Earle is finally effected in a pseudo-national A. S. Convention at Albany. The New York State A. S. Society becomes disorganized, andhe resolutions in which the great majority of the abolitionists expressed their sentiments during 1840, were directed against the formation of a political anti-slavery party; against giving support attance for the sin of stopping their ears at the cry of the poor. At Lynn, on March 10 and 11. 1840, before a large and Lib. 10.46, 47. enthusiastic assembly gathered in quarterly meeting of the E. Garrison as the King of day at Boston. The Albany Convention mustered a hundred and Apr. 1, 1840. twenty-one members enrolled, of whom one hundred and four were from New York State alone. Neith—mere swindling (Lib. 10.119). Henry C. Wright to W. L. Garrison. Philadelphia, [May], 1840. Postmarked May 6. If you see fit, publish this; if not, lay it aside. In a little Ms. inte
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. Garrison's passage is over-long, and on arriving he finds that the Convention, under sectariaition that a thousand dollars should be raised to Anon. Ms. Sept., 1840, to N. P. Rogers. provide for the Standard in his absence; and, thisreat Britain prepared reluctantly by Charles Burleigh Ms. Sept. 26, 1840, to J. S. Gibbons. (who did not approve of the mission), and with letters, among others, from N. P. Rogers, who likewise Ms. Sept. 28, 1840, to F. Jackson. discountenanced the measure. On his part, Mr. Garriing at Worcester was very interesting, but the number of Oct. 6, 7, 1840. delegates in attendance not large. Some three or four hundred dollred were raised by the Fair. The meeting at Springfield Oct. 3, 9, 1840. came very near being a total failure. The time and the place chosmale Anti-Slavery Society, in the Melodeon, last Wednesday Oct. 14, 1840. evening. I was at Groton; but I hear that she acquitted Thankful
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. This October convention is called by friends of Universal Reform to tunity for fresh defamation of Garrison abroad. The year 1840 was, in a fermenting period, distinguished for the number oiety. It met at Chardon-Street Chapel on September 23, 24, 1840; but neither Mr. Garrison's annual report nor the rest of t at the Chardon-Street Chapel on November 17, Lib. 10.190. 1840, and sat for three days, without arriving at any conclusion Quincy thus sketches, for the information of Ms. Dec. 31, 1840. the absent Collins, the Convention, which went off grandlyed the foregoing letter conveyed two from Ms. Dec. 24, 25, 1840, E. Pease to J. A. Collins. Colver to members of the Londone leave of the subject of poisoning Ms. Nov. 9, Dec. [10], 1840, E. Pease to Collins. the English mind against Mr. Garrisones of the ante-bellum period, will find the same men who in 1840 nominated Birney against Van Buren and against Harrison, no
Constitution, 344, actual, 349; annual meeting (1840), 343-351, 355; empty treasury, 415, 420, 432; 9], 1.12, 18. Garrison, Wendell Phillips [b. 1840], birth, 2.385, naming, 386, 413. Garrison, pposition to Third Party, 2.333; annual report (1840), 334; resolutions on Fitch's recantation, 335,418, 419, at Groton, 419, 420, at Methuen, 420 (1840)——Writes annual report Non-Resistance Soc., 2.4al contests, 436; on clerical politicians, 437 (1840).——speeches: against C. Cushing, 1.72, for H. Ges, Joseph K., 2.20. Hayne, Robert Young [1791-1840], debate on nullification with Webster, 1.55; a8, at annual meeting Am. A. S. S. (1839), 297, (1840), 348, 355; delegate to World's Convention, 353n, George W. F., 2.428. Mellen, Prentiss [1764-1840], 1.302. Mercantile Journal (Boston), 2.35. to A. S. constitution, 344; at annual meeting (1840), 348, secedes, 349; at G.'s address, 358; mailWitness (Noyes's), 2.206. Wolf, George [1777-1840], 2.62. Woman's Rights agitation, begun, 2.1[4 mor