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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
Collins infuses new life into the general mass. The people are everywhere eager to hear. I am covered all over with applications to lecture in all parts of the free States. The many base attempts that have been made to cripple my influence, and to render me odious in the eyes of the people, have only served to awaken sympathy, excite curiosity, and to open a wide door for usefulness. Notice the large and harmonious meeting of the Eastern Pennsylvania A. S. Society at Philadelphia in December, 1841, at which, however, the temporary suspension of the Freeman in favor of the Standard was voted (Lib. 12: 2, 3, 7, 8). Of the numerous meetings and conventions now instituted, that at Nantucket in August was a conspicuous Aug. 10, 11, 12, 1841; Lib. 11.130, 134. example of the glad renewal of anti-slavery fellowship (the sectarian spirit having been exorcised), and was otherwise memorable. No report is left of the social delights of companionship between Bradburn (a sort of Geo. B
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
avery Address to Irish-Americans, headed by O'Connell, leader of the repeal agitation in Ireland, tests the pro-slavery spirit of Irish Catholicism in the United States. Garrison comes out openly for the repeal of the Union of North and South, runs up this banner in the Liberator, and launches the debate in the anti-slavery societies. He makes a lecturing tour in Western New York, and falls desperately ill on his return home. Death of his brother James. Remond, landing in Boston in December, 1841, Dec. 21; Lib. 11.207. brought among his undutiable baggage a terse Address of the Irish People to their Countrymen and Lib. 12.39. Countrywomen in America on the subject of slavery. It exhorted them to treat the colored people as equals and brethren, and to unite everywhere with the abolitionists. Sixty thousand names were appended, Ten thousand more were subsequently added (Lib. 12: 63). Daniel O'Connell's at the head, as Member of Parliament and Lord Mayor of Dublin, with Theob