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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 228 228 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 62 62 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 38 38 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 37 37 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 36 36 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 29 29 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 29 29 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 26 26 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1842 AD or search for 1842 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
is last phrase being probably suggested by James G. Birney's tract, The American Churches the Bulwarks of American Slavery (published first, anonymously, in London, Sept. 23, 1840; in a second and third [American] edition in Newburyport, Mass., in 1842; and again, in Boston, in May, 1843). Phoebe Jackson wrote from Providence, Nov. 18, 1842, to Mrs. Garrison, of the recently held annual meeting of the Rhode Island A. S. Society: The strong ground taken by Rogers, Foster, and a few others occasioced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99). He was succeeded by Leavitt as above, and the paper became the Emancipator and Free American (Lib. 11: 191, 203). In 1842 Mr. Wright, in a desperate struggle with poverty, was trying personally to find purchasers for his translation (Lib. 12: 127). Phelps is a city missionary, and on the most amicable terms with Hubbard Lib. 12.127. Winslow, George W. Blagden, et i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. A monster anti-slavery Address to Irish-Americans, headeion in Boston. Henry C. Wright was May 24-26, 1842. ready with fresh resolutions, offered on beha, where I arrived at 7 o'clock in the Nov. 12, 1842. midst of a cold rain-storm. I might have immweather, and the very bad state of Nov. 15-18, 1842; Lib. 13.2, 17. the travelling, and the uncertaiver a lecture on slavery in the same Nov. 21, 1842. place; and at 12 o'clock at night shall leave is somewhat better, and may possibly Nov. 27, 1842. leave to-morrow afternoon for Utica, under my hursday [Friday]) we met agreeably to Nov. 25, 1842. adjournment; but on the opening it was announcxt, I expect to lecture in Albany, and Dec. 2, 1842. on Saturday night hope to embrace you and the at the beginning, not at the close, of the year 1842. In the fall of 1841, Mr. Garrison had removedend that the funeral arrangements and Oct. 16, 1842. ceremonies shall be as plain, simple, and free[11 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
her three avenues of approach— Unitarianism [Brook Farm], Universalism [Hopedale], and Nothingarianism. Ante, p. 25. The Northampton Association of Education and Industry was, indeed, committed to no creed, not even to communism, as it was a joint-stock concern. All its prominent members were known personally to Mr. Garrison, who vouched for them as among the freest and best spirits of the age, Lib. 12.143. when publishing their manifesto. Organization was effected on April 8, Noyes's Am. 1842, and as George W. Benson was one of the founders, Socialisms, p. 155. the progress of the enterprise was constantly reported to his brother-in-law. The subject of social reorganization, wrote the latter on December 16, 1843, to R. D. Ms. Webb, is attracting general attention, and exciting a growing interest. Many schemes are in embryo, and others have had a birth, and are now struggling for an existence. As experiments to bless our race, I feel an interest in them all, though I am not v
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
Lib. 14.202. by his hotel-keeper, nothing remained for Mr. Hoar but to Lib. 15.9. flee the State, which he did, under escort—the company of his daughter more than the gray hairs of this man of sixty-six insuring him from summary violence. I am in hopes, wrote Edmund Quincy to Richard Webb, that Ms. Dec. 14, 1844. Massachusetts will at last be kicked into some degree of spirit. I don't know that anything is left for her but reprisals. Mr. Hoar himself, in a letter on the Latimer case in 1842 (ante, p. 66), referred to the law of Louisiana ordering the arrest of any colored man entering the State from another State, and asked, why, then, might not every free State imprison every incoming native of a slaveholding State (Lib. 12: 177). He reached Charleston on Nov. 28, 1844; his colleague, Henry Hubbard of Pittsfield, Mass., delegated to Louisiana, arrived in New Orleans Dec. 1, and was likewise expelled, but less fiercely (Smith's History of Pittsfield, p. 405; and Lib. 15: 2, 9, 1
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
ance mission to the United States, is invited by the Massachusetts Anti-slavery Society to renew his testimony against slavery (as a signer of the Irish Address of 1842) at a celebration of British West India Emancipation. Garrison drafts and presents the invitation, but is met with shuffling and refusal. He exposes this behavioeeting of the people is confidently anticipated at Worcester, and able and distinguished advocates of liberty have pledged themselves to be present. In the year 1842, an Address from the people of Ireland to their Ante, p. 43. countrymen and countrywomen in America, signed by Ireland's lamented champion, Daniel O'Connell, Yourt the invitation extended by that body, and accepted, was revoked—at least pending an explanation. The Judge had been supplied with a copy of the Irish Address of 1842, with Father Mathew's signature, and wrote to ask Lib. 19.194. him if the document was genuine. The Apostle hesitated long, and then sent the merest line in repl
uth. On November 8, 1851, he sailed from New York, recalling Lib. 21.185. himself for a moment to public attention by issuing a farewell address. He professed to have added more than 600,000 disciples to the cause of total abstinence—an empty boast. He tendered to his countrymen on this side of the Atlantic some wholesome parting advice, but with a grave omission as to their duty towards slavery, which Mr. Garrison supplied by appending to the address in the Liberator the Irish Address of 1842. Father Lib. 21.185. Mathew left also his thanks to individuals—to a slaveholder, first of all: to Henry Clay, namely. To the same hollow friend alike of temperance and of freedom, he wrote on December 29, 1851, from Cork, sending good Colton's Private Corr. of Clay, p. 624. wishes and blessings for the New Year to the pride and glory of the United States, and writing himself down the most grateful of your admirers. Father Mathew had, nevertheless, witnessed on the spot the degradatio