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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for January 28th, 1842 AD or search for January 28th, 1842 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
nothing. His [Burleigh's] manner will do much for a certain class, at certain times; but another class, and the same class, indeed, at other times, need Foster's preaching. See Cyrus Peirce's protests against Abby Kelley's and S. S. Foster's resolutions at Fall River, Nov. 23, 1841, and against their style generally (Lib. 12: 3, 19), with Mrs. Chapman's comment (Lib. 12: 23). Miss Kelley offered a resolution in these terms at the tenth anniversary meeting of the Mass. A. S. Society (Jan. 28, 1842): Resolved, That the sectarian organizations called churches are combinations of thieves, robbers, adulterers, pirates, and murderers, and, as such, form the bulwark of American slavery—this last phrase being probably suggested by James G. Birney's tract, The American Churches the Bulwarks of American Slavery (published first, anonymously, in London, Sept. 23, 1840; in a second and third [American] edition in Newburyport, Mass., in 1842; and again, in Boston, in May, 1843). Phoebe Jackso
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
H. I. Bowditch. for the cause of Freedom or Temperance, except so far as it will build up his own fame. More curiously (if not more lamentably) still, George Bradburn, in his Pioneer, Lib. 19.133. could conceive of many reasons, any one of which would have justified, not only, but demanded Father Mathew's declining to show himself among the Disunionists at Worcester. Yet Bradburn had done what he could to Ante, pp. 43-45. utilize the Irish Address, saying, when it was unrolled, on January 28, 1842, in Faneuil Hall, that he wished Father Lib. 19.133. Mathew or Daniel O'Connell were there to give fit utterance to the fact that Slavery strikes at the interest of every laboring man; and recalling, for the benefit of his Irish auditors, O'Connells scornful refusal to visit a slavepolluted America or to shake hands with American slaveholders, and entreaty of the Irish in this country to join the abolitionists. Mr. Garrison, with the best generalship, concentrating all his editorial