hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 234 234 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 64 64 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 39 39 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 16 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1843 AD or search for 1843 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 234 results in 218 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Charles Conrad, 1843- (search)
Abbott, Charles Conrad, 1843- Naturalist; born in Trenton, N. J., June 4, 1843. He was graduated at the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1865; spent several years in making a valuable collection of archaeological specimens, which he presented to the Peabody Museum at Cambridge, Mass.; and was an assistant in that institution in 1876-89. Among his publications are The Stone age in New Jersey; A naturalist's Rambles about home; several volumes on bird life, and a number of novels.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Barton Stone, 1819-1878 (search)
Alexander, Barton Stone, 1819-1878 Military engineer: born in Kentucky in 1819; was graduated at the Military Academy at West Point in 1842. He was made second lieutenant of engineers in 1843, and captain in 1856. For services at the battle of Bull Run. July, 186;1, he was brevetted major, and in March, 1863, was commissioned major of the engineer corps. For meritorious services during the Civil War, he was brevetted brigadier-general in March, 1865. Active during the war, he was consulting engineer in Sheridan's army in the Shenandoah Valley, and was at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. After the war he spent two years in charge of the construction of public works in Maine. He died in San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 15, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allston, Washington, 1779-1843 (search)
Allston, Washington, 1779-1843 A distinguished painter; born in Waccamaw, S. C., Nov. 5, 1779; was graduated at Harvard College Washington Allston. in 1800; went to Europe the next year to study art, and remained eight years abroad. His numerous works of art exhibit great power in delineating the pictures of a fertile imagination. His skill as a colorist earned him the title of The American Titian. He died in Cambridge, Mass., July 9, 1843.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Antiquities, American. (search)
asioned by the Spanish conquest. These are chiefly, in Central and South America, ruined temples, and, in North America, rude earthworks, now overgrown with venerable forest trees which attest their antiquity. In connection with those in the more southern regions, there are remains of elaborate carvings and ornamental pottery. There are many features in common between the temples and other works of art in Mexico, Central America, and Peru. The explorations of Stephens and Catherwood (1840-43) revealed to the world vast remains of cities in Central America, which were doubtless inhabited at the period of the conquest, 350 years ago. There they found carved monoliths and the remains of highly ornamented temples. The monoliths at Copan some antiquaries are disposed to rank, as to use, with those ruder ones at Stonchenge, in England, and older ones in Arabia. The remains of Aztee art in Mexico attest the existence of a high degree of civilization there at the period of their structu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Apportionment, congressional, (search)
e United States Census of179033,000 From 1803 to 1813 based on the United States Census of180033,000 From 1813 to 1823 based on the United States Census of181035,000 From 1823 to 1833 based on the United States Census of182040,000 From 1833 to 1843 based on the United States Census of183047,700 From 1843 to 1853 based on the United States Census of184070,680 From 1853 to 1863 based on the United States Census of185093,420 From 1863 to 1873 based on the United States Census of1860127,381 United States Census of182040,000 From 1833 to 1843 based on the United States Census of183047,700 From 1843 to 1853 based on the United States Census of184070,680 From 1853 to 1863 based on the United States Census of185093,420 From 1863 to 1873 based on the United States Census of1860127,381 From 1873 to 1883 based on the United States Census of1870131,425 From 1883 to 1893 based on the United States Census of1880151,912 From 1893 to 1903 based on the United States Census of1890173,901
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armstrong, John, 1758-1843 (search)
Armstrong, John, 1758-1843 Military officer; born in Carlisle, Pa., Nov. 25, 1758. While a student at Princeton, in 1775, he became a volunteer in Potter's Pennsylvania regiment, and was soon afterwards made an aide-de-camp to General Mercer. He was afterwards placed on the staff of General Gates, and remained so from the beginning of that officer's campaign against Burgoyne until the end of the war, having the rank of major. Holding a facile pen, he was employed to write the famous John Armstrong. Newburgh addresses. They were powerfully and eloquently written. After the war he was successively Secretary of State and Adjutant-General of Pennsylvania; and in 1784 he conducted operations against the settlers in the Wyoming Valley. The Continental Congress in 1787 appointed him one of the judges for the Northwestern Territory, but he declined. Two years later he married a sister of Chancellor Livingston, removed to New York, purchased a farm within the precincts of the old
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Atlantic Telegraph. (search)
Atlantic Telegraph. In 1843 (Aug. 10), Prof. Samuel F. B. Morse, who had endowed the electro-magnetic telegraph with intellectual power. in a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, remarked. after alluding to recent experiments. The practical inference from this law is, that a telegraphic communication on my plan may, with certainty, be established across the Atlantic. Startling as this may now seem, the time will come when this project will be realized. Almost eleven years afterwards an attempt was made to establish telegraphic communication between America and Europe by means of an insulated metallic cable under the sea. Cyrus W. Field, a New York merchant, was applied to for aid in completing a land line of telegraph on the Morse plan, then in the course of construction across Newfoundland--about 400 miles. The question occurred to him, Why not carry the line across the ocean? and with his usual pluck and energy he proceeded to the accomplishment o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Auger, Christorpher Colon, 1821-1898 (search)
Auger, Christorpher Colon, 1821-1898 Military officer; born in New York July 10, 1821; was graduated at West Point in 1843. He served as aide-de-camp to Generals Hopping and Cushing in the war with Mexico, and in 1861 was made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers, after serving under McDowell. He took command of a division under Banks. and was wounded at the battle of Cedar Mountain, Aug. 9, 1862; the same month he was made major-general of volunteers. In November, 1862, he. reported to General Banks for service in a Southern expedition, and was very active in the siege and capture of Port Hudson. From October, 1863, to August, 1866, he had command of the Department of Washington. and in 1867 he was assigned to the Department of the Platte. In 1869 he was made brigadier-general U. S. A., and in 188,5 was retired. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 16. 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- (search)
l 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841 he became the first principal of the Philadelphia High School; and in 1843 he was appointed superintendent of the United States Coast Survey. His services in this field were of the highest importance. Various universities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-house Board; a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and active in various public labors. Dr. Bache bequeathed $42,000 to the Academy of Natural Science in Philadelphia, for the promotion of researches in p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, Henry, 1811- (search)
a seat in the State legislature in 1837. He was twice re-elected. In that body he effected a reorganization of the Connecticut State school system, and was for four years secretary of the board of school commissioners, during which he wrote a number of able reports on the public schools. His first report (1839) was pronounced by Chancellor Kent a bold and startling document, founded on the most painstaking and critical inquiry. He edited and published the Connecticut School journal. From 1843 to 1849 he had charge of the public schools of Rhode Island, where he established a model system of popular education. Dr. Barnard took great interest in the subject of school-house architecture; and from 1850 to 1854 he was State superintendent of public schools of Connecticut. In 1855 he began the publication of the American journal of education. The same year he became president of the American Association for the Advancement of Education, and was offered the presidency of two State uni
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...