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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 234 234 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 64 64 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 39 39 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1843 AD or search for 1843 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 5 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ible: O Book of Books! though skepticism flout Lib. 11.179. Thy sacred origin, thy worth decry; Though transcendental This adjective was changed to ‘atheistic’ in the edition of Mr. Garrison's Sonnets and other poems, published in Boston in 1843 (p. 64), showing the liberalizing effect upon himself, unsuspected at the time, of those ‘memorable interviews and conversations, in the hall, in the lobbies, or around the doors,’ of which Emerson tells ( Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. iller, the head of the Second-Adventists, and so-called end-ofthe-world man, was at this epoch preaching in Massachusetts that the day of probation, preceding the millennium, was no further off than a date somewhere between the vernal equinoxes of 1843-44. he warns them to beware of those who abjure all stations of worldly trust and preferment; who insist that Christians cannot wield carnal weapons for the destruction of their enemies; who, when smitten on the one cheek, turn the other also to
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
he contagion which he found raging Lib. 13.10. among his little ones, on his arrival home: Garrison was very ill, wrote Edmund Quincy to Richard Ms. Jan. 29, 1843. D. Webb, as ill, I suppose, as a man could be and live. He said, and from his description I have no doubt of it, that his scarlet fever was no whit less virulenthapman Oct. 3, 1842; Lib. 12.159. died in his thirty-ninth year, with Roman philosophy: I happened, wrote Edmund Quincy to Richard Webb, to Ms. Jan. 29, 1843. call not long after his departure, and was invited, as one who had long stood in the relation of a brother to the family, to the chamber of death. It was the mosry for the causes of peace, abolition, temperance, chastity, and a pure and equal Christianity. The suspension of its organ, however, beyond hope of Ms. Mar, 26, 1843, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb. recovery, showed that the limit of organized growth had been reached, and that the millennial expectations of the Declaration of Sentimen
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
Chapter 3: the covenant with death.—1843. After a summer at the water-cure, Garrison makes his home in Boston, and renews with vigor the disunion campaign. Honization. Edmund Quincy to Richard D. Webb. Dedham, June 27 (–July 26), 1843. Ms. Garrison has been but in indifferent health since his dreadful illness I am bold to prophesy. At the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Jan. 27, 1843. Anti-Slavery Society in Faneuil Hall, he secured the passage of the following re ensuing year. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb. Dedham, June 27 (–July 26), 1843. Ms. I don't exactly remember when I wrote to you last, but am sure it was bement of the Constitution, the progress of disunion was considerable in the year 1843. Massachusetts passed, in Lib. 13.55. answer to the Latimer petition, a Persona I am told that Garrison's opinions, as well as Rogers's, have Ms. Nov. 27, 1843. been greatly modified of late with regard to the Bible. He is ZZZ27 pretty wel<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
solution of the Union. The letters addressed to the Convention by the most eminent Republican politicians of the day revealed their irresolution and utter impotency before the unchecked advance of the Slave Power. Charles Francis Adams, who in 1843 had incurred the charge of being a Ante, pp. 92, 93. disunionist by his simple proposal of an amendment to the Constitution abolishing slave representation, still found the greatest defect in the Constitution to be the antirepub-lican preponderanhe True Democrat (afterwards the Leader). He had greatly impaired his health by taking the stump for Fremont (Life of Bradburn, pp. 229, 233). and Mr. Tilden, M. C., Daniel R. Tilden, a native of Connecticut, Representative in Congress of Ohio, 1843-47. See in Sanborn's Life of John Brown, p. 609, Brown's letter to Tilden written in Charlestown jail Nov. 28, 1859. On Dec. 2, 1859, he participated in the mass-meeting held at Cleveland in commemoration of the execution of Brown (Lib. 29: 211
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
the South be so obliging as to secede from the Union? Lib. 30.163. asked Mr. Garrison. And, I salute your Convention with hope and joy, he wrote to his Lib. 30.175. friend Johnston in Vermont, on October 15. All the omens are with us. Forward! N. R. Johnston. On the sixth of November, Lincoln was elected by the vote of every Northern Lib. 30.178. State save one; and that array of the North under one banner and the South under an opposing banner foreseen Ante, p. 87. by Mr. Garrison in 1843—with the issue sure, whether prudence or desperation ruled the counsels of the Slave Power—at length came to pass. For the first time in our history, said Wendell Phillips, the slave has chosen Lib. 30.184. a President of the United States. . . . Lincoln is in place, Garrison in power. The Governor of South Carolina, after the October handwriting on the wall, had called an extra session of Lib. 30.171, 181. the Legislature to provide for a disunion convention in case of Lincoln's electi