hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 234 234 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 64 64 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 39 39 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1843 AD or search for 1843 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 7 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
itten by somebody who understands the subject, and who praises with great discrimination. Some of my friends suppose that it is done by John Allen, M. D., 1770-1843; an inmate of Holland House for more than forty years; a contributor to the Edinburgh Review on subjects relating to English, French, and Spanish history and the Bl say he is a failure,—and these, too, are some of his most intimate friends. I may mention Sutton Sharpe An eminent chancery barrister; he died of apoplexy in 1843. and John Romilly, both of whom in politics coincide with Lord Langdale; but who said with regret that he had disappointed them as a judge. His decisions amount tce as an equity lawyer; sat in Parliament for the boroughs of Rye and Ripon; was raised to the peerage, in 1858, with the title of Baron Kingsdown. He assumed, in 1843, the additional surname of Leigh. See Brougham's opinion of Follett and Pemberton, ante, Vol. I. p. 351. is decidedly the best. He is a bachelor and a Tory. In
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
He is most eloquent; and his voice, as I heard it in the Lords six months ago, still rings in my ear. And yet I cannot pardon his gross want of propriety in conversation. Think of the language I heard him use about O'Connell. He called him a damned thief. You will also read the article on Prescott in the Edinburgh. It is written by somebody who understands the subject, and who praises with great discrimination. Some of my friends suppose that it is done by John Allen, M. D., 1770-1843; an inmate of Holland House for more than forty years; a contributor to the Edinburgh Review on subjects relating to English, French, and Spanish history and the British Constitution; and author of Inquiry into the Rise and Growth of the Royal Prerogative in England. Sydney Smith introduced him to Lord Holland, who had asked if he could recommend any clever young Scotch medical man to accompany him to Spain.—Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite un
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
ably his only travelling by railway n the Continent. he visited Berlin, where he remained five weeks. Here he saw much of society, and conversed with the celebrated savans,Humboldt, Savigny, With this jurist, who afterwards frequently inquired of Mr. Fay about him, he discussed his favorite theme of codification. Ranke, and Raumer. Mr. Wheaton, the American Minister, was absent from his post, but Sumner formed a lasting friendship with the Secretary of Legation, Theodore S. Fay. In 1842-43, Sumner intervened successfully with Mr. Webster, then Secretary of State in behalf of Mr. Fay, whose position was endangered by an intrigue. In 1861, he obtained an assurance from Mr. Lincoln that Mr. Fay, then Minister to Switzerland, should not be disturbed; but the President soon after gave the place to another as a reward for party service. Fay wrote to Sumner from Berlin, Jan. 14, 1840, warm with affection: Your departure, he said, has thrown a shade over our little circle and haunt
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
, among the hills of Berkshire with my sisters; but I shall always be within hail from Boston. Good-night. As ever, ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Mittermaier, Heidelberg. Boston, Aug. 4, 1842. my dear friend,—I am ashamed that I have left your kind letter of Feb. 8 for so long a time without acknowledgment; but various calls have absorbed my time, and I now write in haste in order to introduce to you my friend, Mr. Wheeler, Charles S. Wheeler, who died at Leipsic, in 1843, at the age of twenty-six. who has been for some time a tutor in Harvard University. He has published a valuable edition of Herodotus, and has otherwise made himself very favorably known to the scholars of my country. He hopes to pass several months in delightful Heidelberg; and I wish to commend him to your kind attentions during his stay. I send you two copies of the sixteenth report of the Prison Discipline Society; also two copies of Dr. Howe's Report on the Blind, embracing the accou
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. The strong interest which while abroad Sumner took in Thomas Crawford, whose acquaintance he n the subject; and, this being the case, I cannot but hope that fruit may speedily follow. In 1843, Sumner began to contribute to the Law Reporter,— a magazine founded and then conducted by Peleg elve hundred dollars a year. This was Sumner's last year of service in that capacity. Early in 1843, Mr. Peters lost the office of Reporter of the Supreme Court. Judge Story, when he foresaw that a had found communion with Howe a help and solace, sorely felt the separation. During the years 1843-44, Sumner suffered from depression of spirits. He took a gloomy view of what he had done or wasrning, Aug. 22, 1843. my dear Ware, Mr. Ware, a graduate of Harvard College of the class of 1843, writes: I went with Professor Felton one day, just after our Commencement parts had been assi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
had upon young men, and upon all who, against organized capital, society, the traditions of party, and fear of change, even of revolution, made opposition to the extension and perpetuity of Slavery their highest duty to country and mankind. In 1843-44 Sumner was engaged, on behalf of his State, in collecting the local proofs in the long-standing boundary controversy between Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and for that purpose visited the disputed territory. This service was rendered at the escort in society. With poignant grief he watched her sure decline. There was never a moment when he would not have gladly given his life for hers. In the spring of 1842 she gave up her studies, on account of ill health. With the beginning of 1843 she had a severe hemorrhage; and in the summer and autumn her increasing weakness and pallor of countenance were evident. In the spring of 1844 she was fading fast. During his own illness, the almost sleepless mother was passing from the bed of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
imes confessed a decline of public interest in the festival; and they strove to revive it by the selection of a more impressive theme. The three city orators who immediately preceded Sumner were Peleg W. Chandler in 1844, Charles Francis Adams in 1843, and Horace Mann in 1842. They each spoke with earnestness and power; the first two on historical subjects, and the last on popular education, to which he was then devoting himself with extraordinary industry and enthusiasm. But among the oratioens for his learning and accomplishments. The theme he chose grew out of convictions held for some years, and dwelt upon in his private correspondence. The substantial doctrines of his oration are briefly developed in letters written in 1839 and 1843-44, already printed in these pages; Ante, Vol. II. pp. 82, 266, 267, 278, 300, 301, 314, 315. and while in Europe, and after his return, he wrote earnestly against any war between the two kindred nations, England and the United States. Ante, V