hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 192 192 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 88 88 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 32 32 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 25 25 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 23 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for 1844 AD or search for 1844 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights, Chapter 1: Theodore Roosevelt and the Abolitionists (search)
ing all they could to hold it back. Lincoln in 1860 occupied more nearly the ground held by Clay than that held by Birney; and the men who supported the latter in 1844 were the prototypes of those who worked to oppose Lincoln in 1860, and only worked less hard because they had less chance. The ultra Abolitionists discarded exped. In citing the action of Joshua R. Giddings as an anti-third-party man, Mr. Roosevelt is not altogether fortunate. Subsequent to the presidential campaign of 1844, the third-party Abolitionists held a convention in Pittsburg, in which Giddings was a leading actor. As chairman of the committee on platform, he submitted a resof abstract right, but of political expediency. In 1840, the vote of the third-party Abolitionists, then for the first time in the political field, was 7000; in 1844 it was 60,000, and in 1848 it was nearly 300,000. From that time, with occasional backsets, Mr. Roosevelt's political criminals went steadily forward until they m
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights, Chapter 2: the Abolitionists — who and what they were (search)
hem forget themselves. Their impulses seemed to be largely intuitive, if not instinctive, and if called upon for a philosophical explanation they could not have given it. In such a struggle for freedom and natural human rights as was carried on by the Abolitionists against tremendous odds and through a term covering many long years, it does seem to the writer of this essay that mortal heroism reached its height. Nor am I by any means alone in the opinion just expressed. As far back as 1844, when the Abolitionists were few in number and the objects of almost savage persecution in every part of our country, the Earl of Carlisle, who, in his day was one of the most capable leaders of British public opinion, declared that they were engaged in fighting a battle without a parallel in the history of ancient or modern heroism. I am moved to write the story of the Abolitionists, partly because it is full of romantic interest, and partly because justice demands it. Those doughty file
ate. Birney went with his belongings to Ohio, thinking that upon the soil of a free State he would be safe from molestation. He established a newspaper in Cincinnati to advocate emancipation. A mob promptly destroyed his press and other property, and it was with difficulty that he escaped with his life. More sagacious, although not more zealous, than Lundy and Garrison and a good many of their followers, Birney early saw the necessity of political action in the interest of freedom. He was the real founder of the old Liberty party, of which he was the presidential candidate in 1840 and in 1844. Of course, there were other early laborers for emancipation that, in this connection, ought to be mentioned and remembered. They were pioneers in the truest sense. The writer would gladly make a record of their services, and pay a tribute, especially, to the memories of such as have gone to the spirit land, where the great majority are now mustered, but space at this point forbids.
t Buffalo in 1848, which formulated the Free-soil party-successor to the Liberty party-and wrote the platform which it adopted. In speaking of Chase's share in the independent organization of this time, William M. Evarts says: He must be awarded the full credit of having understood, resolved upon, planned, organized, and executed this political movement. The movement thus conducted by Mr. Chase was slow and tremendously laborious, but it was effective. In the presidential elections of 1844 and 1848 it held the balance of power and turned the scale to further its purposes. In 1852 it shattered and destroyed one of the old pro-slavery parties, and became the second party in the country instead of the third. In eight years more it was the first. The charge has been made against Mr. Chase that, while a member of Lincoln's Cabinet, he aspired to supersede his chief in the Presidency. But did he not have a right to seek the higher office, especially when the policy pursued by i
khurst, Jonathan, 203. Pennsylvania Hall, firing of, 30. Peonage, 80. Phelps, Amos, 202, 204. Philippine Islands, 82-87; slavery in, 82; massacres in, 83; abuses in, 82-84; spoliation of, 85. Phillips,Wendell, 142; speech in Faneuil Hall, 88-89. Phillips, Mrs., 106-107. Pillsbury, Parker, 204. Pleasanton, General, 168. Pointdexter, 165. Popular sovereignty, 153. Powell, Aaron M., 205. Prayer of Twenty Millions, The, 142; text of, 214-215. Prentice, John, 203. Presidential campaign of 1844, 7. Price, General Sterling, 160, 195. Prohibitionists, 2, 3, 14. Purviss, Robert, 203. Putnam, George M., 205. Q Quantrell, 65. R Rankin, John, 203. Raymond, Henry J., Life of Lincoln, 177. Redmond, C. L., 205. Republican party, 2, 3, 7, 8; elements of, 10; lack of policy, 10; and election of Lincoln, 11; existence due to Abolitionists, 12; and negro rights, 81; and Philippine Islands, 82; and Abolitionism, 150-151. Republican Party, History of the, Curtis, 136. Rise and Fal