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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 192 192 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 88 88 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 32 32 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 25 25 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 23 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1844 AD or search for 1844 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 9 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
rld; and, in order suitably to affect the minds of those who listened to him, and to prepare them for the speedy coming of the Son of Man (an event, by the way, which we believe transpired eighteen Lib. 13.23, 27. hundred years ago), Father Miller, the head of the Second-Adventists, and so-called end-ofthe-world man, was at this epoch preaching in Massachusetts that the day of probation, preceding the millennium, was no further off than a date somewhere between the vernal equinoxes of 1843-44. he warns them to beware of those who abjure all stations of worldly trust and preferment; who insist that Christians cannot wield carnal weapons for the destruction of their enemies; who, when smitten on the one cheek, turn the other also to the smiter; and who are willing to die for their foes, as did Jesus for his, rather than to imprison, maim, or destroy them! The doctrines defended in the foregoing extracts continued, as heretofore, to be merely subsidiary to Mr. Garrison's lifework.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ughout the South, and sustained by the leading Democratic journals—and why? To secure the aid of the Irish voters on the side of slavery, and to bring their united strength to bear against the anti-slavery enterprise. More particularly—to insure the Southern control of the next Administration in the interest of Texan annexation. The marked increase in the Irish immigration now first began to have a Federal political significance, as would abundantly appear at the Presidential election in 1844. Also, if possible, by sending over Lib. 12.42, 43, 98. donations to Ireland, to stop O'Connell's mouth on the subject of slavery, and to prevent any more interference on that point, from that side of the Atlantic! Hence, I observe, at the Repeal meetings in various parts of the country, resolutions and Lib. 12.37, 47, 49, 50, 82. declarations which amount to sacred pledges, that these repealers will stand by Southern institutions at all hazards! Now, by the Address, which will cause ever
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
see; that important topics, which you feel to be such, are too often either entirely passed over or very cursorily treated, and important moments like the present neglected. Perhaps the last Liberator and the present are the two most Nov. 3, 10, 1844. important ones in the year, as thousands of persons read them, on account of the elections, who never open an A. S. paper at any other time. And yet the last was without editorial. We have our suspicions, too, that good friends have been disadissolution—as being in violation of the national compact. We not only assert that the people of the free States ought not to submit to it, but we say, with confidence, they would not submit to it. William Slade, elected Governor of Vermont in 1844, discussed annexation at great length in his message to the Legislature, saying: Upon the consummation of the threatened measure, I do not hesitate to say that it would be the duty of Vermont to declare her unalterable determination to have no con
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!—1844. The American Anti-slavery Society and the New E State House at the twelfth annual Jan. 24-27, 1844. meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Socihese circumstances was admirable, Ms. Jan. 30, 1844. wrote Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb, and sion of the area of slavery. In this very year, 1844, toasts Lib. 14.129, 141. were drunk on the Foing to New York. The results of this May 7-9, 1844. meeting, which lasted three days, were tersely enthusiasm. Banners multiplied in this year 1844, and became the visible token of the new crusadhe editor of the Liberator in this crowded year 1844, when the press of Lib. 14.207. matter claiminmund Quincy to Richard Webb, that Ms. Dec. 14, 1844. Massachusetts will at last be kicked into somell summer, of addressing Garrison Ms. Nov. 29, 1844. a long letter for the Press, and I communicate Court-house on the 1st of August in this year (1844) to celebrate the anniversary of the liberation[2 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
mith lamented in New Lib. 16.77. York a falling away on all sides, and W. L. Chaplin and J. C. Jackson confirmed his statements. Only one dollar was raised to ten formerly. Edmund Quincy judged it at Lib. 16.174, 175. this time to be on its last legs; and the fall elections showed that it could send only five Representatives out of Lib. 16.194. 232 to the Massachusetts lower House, polling a total vote of about 10,000. In New York it cast but 12,000 votes, Lib. 17.11. against 16,000 in 1844. Quincy was quite right in Lib. 16.194. assuring Webb that— There are many more A. S. Whigs and Democrats than Ms. Mar. 28, 1847. Third Party men, and many more Whig papers, especially, which are more thoroughly anti-slavery than any of the Third Cf. Lib. 17.170. Party ones. There is not a Third Party paper that compares in thoroughness and usefulness with the Boston Whig, or even the N. Y. Tribune. And they have not a man who comes near Charles F. Adams (son of J. Q. A.), editor
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
n on any other Lib. 18.67.—thus making Sunday not the best but the worst day of the week. Contrary to Phillips's and Quincy's Ante, pp. 218, 219. view, therefore, anti-Sabbatarianism must, for abolitionists, be allowed to have been a moral rather than a theological reform. As for Mr. Garrison himself, his emancipation from the traditional views of the Sabbath proceeded on lines already displayed in this narrative; and Ante, 2.51, 107-114, 152-154; 3.3, 9, 65. as far back as the summer of 1844, remarking the roving commission of the Rev. Justin Edwards, D. D., of Andover, for a year past, to enforce Sabbatarianism, he proposed a Lib. 14.110. New England Convention to discuss the Sabbath. Occurrences meanwhile, on both sides of the Atlantic, had made such a meeting seem imperative, whether from the standpoint of an abolitionist or of a universal reformer. But now his rally was of anti-Sabbatarians who needed no converting, but should unite their voices in protest. Hence the Addr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
to Palfrey and Jay was 22, and seemed too low to apply to the South at large, as the size of gangs increased going Gulfward (Lib. 20: 38). In a speech delivered in 1844, Cassius Clay said, 31,495 only [of the then population of Kentucky] the Auditor's books show to be slaveholders (Ms. June 11, 1888, C. M. Clay to Gen. Fayette Heand the headquarters of the Empire Club, an organization of roughs and desperadoes who acknowledged his captaincy. His campaigning in behalf of Polk and Dallas in 1844 secured him the friendly Lib. 15.55. patronage of the successful candidate for Vice-President, Geo. M. Dallas. and he took office as Weigher in the Custom-house g in New York—a seeming inconsistency, but it was charged against Rynders that he had offered Lib. 20.86. to give the State of New York to Clay in the election of 1844 for $30,000, and met with a reluctant refusal. In March he was arrested for a brutal assault on a gentleman Lib. 20.43. in a hotel, but the victim and the witnes
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
wards a General in the civil war and U. S. Attorney-General under President Hayes's Administration. offered to make the arrest if the claimant would precede and point out the man. The claimant declined, went to Washington, complained, and it was during the marshal's absence to answer that complaint that Lib. 21.30. Shadrach was rescued from his deputy. Buffum was boasting, rather unadvisedly, while he was James N. Buffum. giving bail for Lewis Hayden, A fugitive slave from Kentucky in 1844, become a leading colored citizen of Boston; one of the staunchest friends of Mr. Garrison. He was an efficient member of the Vigilance Committee and among the rescuers of the fugitive Shadrach, and was duly brought to trial by the U. S. Government, with others, both white and black (Lib. 21: 35, 39, 43, 87, 94, 97, 99, 179, [183]). It was at his house, barricaded and armed, that George Thompson visited William and Ellen Craft on Sunday, Nov. 3, 1850 (Lib. 21: 153). that he heard Shadrach pr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
ay, and Joshua Leavitt. On Cassius Clay's offering the toast—The True Union: To Benton, to Bryant, to T. H. Benton. W. C. Bryant. W. H. Seward. H. Greeley. Seward, to Greeley, to Garrison, to Phillips, to Quincy— the union of all the opponents of the propaganda of slavery, there were loud calls for Garrison, who responded with peculiar felicity, paying just tributes to Hale and to Lib. 23.74. Clay, The first meeting of Garrison and C. M. Clay, whenever it took place, was not as early as 1844, as the latter records in his Autobiography (1: 99; see Lib. 16: 23). I said to him: Why, Garrison, I had expected to see a long-faced ascetic; but I see you patriots are jolly, sleek fellows—not at all debarred of the good things of life. He replied, in the same vein: And therein, Clay, you are wrong, and somewhat confound things. The ascetics are the wrong-doers! Who should be happy, if not those who are always right? Garrison was a man of great common sense and much wit. yet not forg<