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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 192 192 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 88 88 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 32 32 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 25 25 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 23 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1844 AD or search for 1844 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
a most remarkable man. The terms of freedom and familiarity on which I found myself with all these—and, I may add, with a most extensive literary and legal circle that I meet—you may infer from the slight fact that they address me without any prefix, as Sumner; and I, of course, do the same with them. Sir William Follett always meets me on that footing. It was only night before last that I dined at his house. We had at table Sir Frederick Pollock, Serjeant Talfourd, Theodore Hook, 1788-1844. Charles Austin,—one of the cleverest, most enlightened, and agreeable men in London,—and Crowder, the Queen's counsel. Talfourd Thomas Noon Talfourd, 1795-1854. He entered Parliament in 1835, and the same year gave to the public his tragedy of Ion. His Athenian Captive followed in 1838. His Copyright Act distinguishes his Parliamentary career. In 1849, he was made a judge of the Common Pleas, and knighted. He died suddenly of apoplexy, while discharging his official duties. Talfou
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ages have been Leigh Hunt 1784-1859. and Thomas Campbell. 1777-1844. I yesterday morning saw Leigh Hunt, on the introduction of Carlyle.ge of the Common Pleas, Jan. 9, 1839,—resigning the latter office in 1844, on account of ill health. It so happened that I dined in company wi, as Baron Abinger. He presided in the Exchequer until his death in 1844. His failure as a judge was hardly less conspicuous than his succesorses. I shall send you some of Sir Henry Halford's verses: 1766-1844. He was the brother of Mr. Justice Vaughan and of Sir Charles R. Vauand reappointed in 1841: became Lord Chief-Baron of the Exchequer in 1844, and resigned in 1866. He represented Huntingdon in Parliament from 1831 to 1844; was twice married, and was the father of twenty-five children. is deemed a great failure. He was the Tory Attorney-General, anby the city of Oxford in 1837; became a judge of the Common Pleas in 1844, and of the Queen's Bench in 1846; Chief-Justice of the Common Pleas
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
Jan. 27, 1839. Among the persons whom I have seen since I wrote the foregoing pages have been Leigh Hunt 1784-1859. and Thomas Campbell. 1777-1844. I yesterday morning saw Leigh Hunt, on the introduction of Carlyle. He lives far from town,—in Chelsea,—in a humble house, with uncarpeted entry and stairs. He lives more simply, I think, than any person I have visited in England; but he possesses a palace of a mind. He is truly brilliant in conversation, and the little notes of his which I have seen are very striking. He is of about the middle size, with iron-gray hair parted in the middle, and suffered to grow quite long. Longfellow has seen him, I think, and he will tell you about him. I believe I have already described to you Carlyle. I met Campbell at a dinner which Colburn, Henry Colburn died in 1855. His residence was at 13 Great Marlborough Street. the publisher, gave me last evening. There were Campbell, Jerdan, William Jerdan, born 1782, for thirty-four ye
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
a sketch for that: the painter tried, and then delayed, and then despaired, till Chantrey undertook it himself. The covering which I have sometimes heard called a Roman toga is nothing but a cloak. Chantrey laughed at the idea of its being a toga, saying that he had never seen one; it was modelled from a cloak,—a present from Canova to Chantrey. This cloak was stolen by a servant of an inn where the sculptor was changing horses. I shall send you some of Sir Henry Halford's verses: 1766-1844. He was the brother of Mr. Justice Vaughan and of Sir Charles R. Vaughan, and exchanged his family name for that of a relative, from whom he had inherited a large fortune. He was physician to four successive sovereigns,—George III., George IV., William IV., and Victoria. He was President of the College of Physicians from 1820 until his death. His professional income is said to have been ten thousand pounds a year. He practised Latin composition in prose and verse. you know that he is one
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
American travellers who were likely to invest in works of art. Nor did his zeal in the cause of the young artist end here, as the sequel will show. Crawford, truly grateful for this kindly interest, was anxious to take a bust of Sumner, who consented reluctantly upon Greene's assuring him that he would thereby render a service to his friend. It is the earliest representation of Sumner, and was thought at the time to be faithful to the original. William H. Prescott wrote concerning it, in 1844: It is a very good likeness and a beautiful piece of work, like every thing else from Crawford's chisel. The bust is among the works of art bequeathed by Sumner to the city of Boston, and is now in the Art Museum. Sir Charles Vaughan and John Kenyon, on different occasions, saw it in Greene's library a few months later, and each was so struck with the likeness that he gave Crawford a commission to take a bust of himself. William W. Story writes, of this visit of Sumner to Rome: It was
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
ho had followed him with urgent letters of invitation: and from Heidelberg he went to the Rhine, thence to Cologne, Brussels, At Brussels he formed a pleasant acquaintance with Virgil Maxcy, then Charge d'affaires to Belgium, who was killed, in 1844, by the explosion of a gun on board the United States steamer Princeton. and Antwerp, and crossed to London, where he arrived, March 17, after a year's absence from England. His letters from Germany (and the remark is true also of his letters fros as well as hind-legs, one head fast asleep, the next on the ground, eyes half open, the next raised and gaping. I write this for Crawford. They have the sense here to admire Thorwaldsen, Albert Bertel Thorwaldsen, the Danish sculptor. 1770-1844. and the king hopes to catch him in his passage to Italy and give him a fete.I was present at the first uncovering, to the sound of music, of the equestrian statue by Thorwaldsen of Maximilian the Elector; it is the finest equestrian I have ever s
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
sted five years; and the pleadings and evidence were voluminous. Sumner became very zealous in the controversy, and during the autumn of 1841 was engaged in taking testimony in Boston, New Haven, and New York. His final argument of the cause in 1844 will be referred to hereafter. England was at this time asserting the right to search vessels carrying the American flag, when they were suspected both of being engaged in the slave-trade and of being other than American vessels; and her ships . Bellenden Ker; Henry Reeve; Abraham Hayward; Alexander Cochrane; Thomas Brown; Mrs. Anne B. Montagu; Edward Rushton, of Liverpool; Edward Dowling, Mr. Dowling went in 1840 to Canada, as legal adviser of the Governor-General, and died there in 1844. and others. Thomas Falconer, who visited Texas, and published a book on the Discovery of the Mississippi, wrote frequently while travelling, and while at home at Putney Hall. From Mittermaier, Foelix, and Julius, he also received tidings, —part
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
stry soon filled it with a collection of expressive and original works. Crawford came to this country in the autumn of 1844, and during this visit married Miss Louisa Ward,—one of the Three Graces of Bond Street,—whom he had previously met at Rommost inspiring memorial of Revolutionary patriotism which American art has created. Crawford wrote to George Sumner, in 1844:— I am looking forward, my dear George, with an intensity of pleasure to meeting your truly glorious brother Charlesations; December, 1843; Vol. VI. p. 380. and The University of Heidelberg. December, 1843; Vol. VI. p. 381. In 1844, he contributed the following: Wallace's Reporters; January, 1844; Vol. VI. pp. 425, 426. Reports of the State of Maino craved sympathy and had found communion with Howe a help and solace, sorely felt the separation. During the years 1843-44, Sumner suffered from depression of spirits. He took a gloomy view of what he had done or was likely to do, and became wea<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
lection.—editing Vesey, Jr.—dangerous illness. 1844.—Age, 33. The national election of 1844, in 1844, in which the Whigs had counted with great confidence on the promotion of their favorite leader, Henry C highest duty to country and mankind. In 1843-44 Sumner was engaged, on behalf of his State, in ces of the several counsel. In the winter of 1844-45, he was counsel before a legislative committhe location which he urged. In the spring of 1844 Sumner undertook to edit the Equity Reports of odore, whose widow was living at Stockbridge in 1844, was the father of Theodore Sedgwick, who was t of countenance were evident. In the spring of 1844 she was fading fast. During his own illness, tlicate health for two years before her death in 1844; and the last summer of her life my brother Chaom time to time, Browne removed to Boston in 1844. but the old intimacy was not renewed. At one . Waterston. Hancock Street, Saturday Evening [1844]. my dear Waterston,—I have delayed in ackn
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
ining with his party vote the local vote of his neighborhood. It may be mentioned that, among members of the School Committee chosen in other wards at this election, were Sidney Bartlett, Theophilus Parsons, and Dr. Howe. This is the only instance in which Sumner was ever a candidate for the direct votes of the people, except when, in 1852, the town of Marshfield, to his regret, elected him a member of the State Constitutional Convention. Several friends of Mr. Mann met, in the winter of 1844-45, with the view of expressing their sympathy with him in his recent controversy, and their gratitude for his perseverance and devotion in the cause of popular education. At their request, Sumner prepared the draft of a formal letter, which, signed by twenty-four gentlemen, was sent to Mr. Mann. The latter was greatly cheered by this tribute, and replied in a note which showed how deeply he was touched by it. Mrs. Mann, at the same time, wrote a personal note to Sumner, expressing a deep s
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