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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 279 279 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 78 78 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 33 33 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 31 31 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 30 30 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 29 29 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for 1845 AD or search for 1845 AD in all documents.

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g a long tap root, thrive best on the spot where the acorn is planted. While the Waverley oaks are not as large nor as old as the big Redwoods of California, they are the largest and oldest trees we have, and we are correspondingly proud of them. Doubtless there is not another group of such notable trees in the eastern states. There are twenty-five of them, the largest sending up its trunk eighty feet into the air, and measuring eighteen and one-half feet, five feet above the ground. In 1845, one of the smaller trees was cut down. Lowell counted the rings and found they numbered seven hundred and fifty. So that Agassiz' estimate that they must be in the neighborhood of a thousand years of age was not far wrong. The distinguishing mark of the oak is its horizontal branching. Dr. Holmes has spoken of this and says: All the rest of the trees shirk the work of resisting gravity; the oak alone defies it. It chooses the horizontal direction for its limbs, so that their whole weight