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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 279 279 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 78 78 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 33 33 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 31 31 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 30 30 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 29 29 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10.. You can also browse the collection for 1845 AD or search for 1845 AD in all documents.

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sisters, would well nigh have passed from the memory of living men. At times it seems to have come over Charles Brooks that perhaps his three years of hard, though ultimately successful work might not have secured a firm place in history. In 1845, we find that in a letter giving an account of his labors he tried to forecast the future. He indulged in a little fancy and said, Some educational antiquary, in his pardonable weakness, may show my lectures fifty years hence as they sometimes shthrough failing eyesight, he was compelled to resign. One result of this foreign study was the compilation of a text-book entitled Elements of Ornithology, a copy of which he gave to the library at Harvard University. Two years later, that is, 1845, we find him on the Boston school committee, and, as usual, active in the work. In 1848, still carrying out his old desire to do something concerning a cause which aroused sympathy, he instituted the Society for the Relief of Aged and Destitute C