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ur of nations. compliments of Richard Cobden, Chief-justice Story, and Theodore Parker. extracts from the speech. efforts to prevent the final vote on the Annexation of Texas. Mr. Sumner takes open ground against slavery in his speech of Nov. 4, 1845. extracts from this speech. notice of Mr. Sumner's stand by Mr. Wilson. Mr. Sumner's preparation for his course. his Persistency. Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do ions signed, in various sections of our State, and eloquent speeches made by Edmund Quincy, Henry Wilson, Theodore Parker, William Henry Channing, R. W. Emerson, and others, with the design of influencing Congress on the final vote, On the 4th of November, 1845, a large meeting was held in Faneuil Hall in Boston, at which resolutions drawn up by Mr. Sumner were presented, setting forth that the annexation of Texas was sought for the purpose of increasing the market in human flesh, of extending an
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
upon their banners, the repeal of slavery under the constitution and laws of the federal government. Iv. In the first address he delivered on a plan of action with a view to the ultimate abolition of slavery, he said, in Faneuil Hall, Nov. 4th, 1845: The time has passed when this can be opposed on constitutional grounds. It will not be questioned by any competent authority that Congress may, by express legislation, abolish slavery, first, in the District of Columbia; second, in theuit new exigencies and new conditions of feeling. The wise framers of this instrument did not treat the country as a Chinese foot, never to grow after its infancy, but anticipated the changes incident to its growth. But it was not until November 4, 1845, that he took his final position on the subject; and this he did in addressing a mass-meeting in Faneuil Hall, against the annexation of Texas. In the opening of that speech, to every sentence of which the future was to impart strange signi
Iv. In the first address he delivered on a plan of action with a view to the ultimate abolition of slavery, he said, in Faneuil Hall, Nov. 4th, 1845: The time has passed when this can be opposed on constitutional grounds. It will not be questioned by any competent authority that Congress may, by express legislation, abolish slavery, first, in the District of Columbia; second, in the Territories, if there should be any; third, that it may abolish the slave trade on the high seas betweeuit new exigencies and new conditions of feeling. The wise framers of this instrument did not treat the country as a Chinese foot, never to grow after its infancy, but anticipated the changes incident to its growth. But it was not until November 4, 1845, that he took his final position on the subject; and this he did in addressing a mass-meeting in Faneuil Hall, against the annexation of Texas. In the opening of that speech, to every sentence of which the future was to impart strange signi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
essor of sacred literature in Harvard University, 1831-39; and a member of Congress, 1847-49. among his various contributions to literature is a history of New England. his article on Lord Mahon's history of England,-printed in the North American Review, of which he was for several years the editor,—was in Sumner's judgment one of the best specimens of criticism which our country has produced. Allibone's Dictionary of authors, Vol. II. p. 1491. Sumner began his first political speech, Nov. 4, 1845, with a tribute to Dr. Palfrey for his manumission of inherited slaves,—the legal details of which Sumner had assisted in arranging. Works, Vol. I. p. 151. they were at this period, and for many years after, very closely associated with each other in the political movement against slavery. Cambridge. Boston, Feb. 5, 1836. my dear Sir,—It will give me great pleasure to write an article on the Uses and Importance of History, considering several topics suggested by Dr. Lieber's inaugur<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
re within an hour's steaming of the French, who are actually wild for a descent on England, after Thiers's romance of the camp at Boulogne, in his last volume. I know that Dr. Wayland holds it better to submit to invasion than to incur the guilt of war. But guilt rests in the motive; and if the motive is protection, not annoyance, does it contravene the precepts of the Gospel? . . . The last report I had of your doings was the account of the Anti-Texas meeting. Speech at Faneuil Hall, Nov. 4, 1845. Works, Vol. I. p. 149. I am really proud, my good friend, of the prominence of your exertions on every occasion in behalf of justice and mercy against any odds of unpopularity. Sir Charles R. Vaughan wrote from Oxford, Dec. 28:— You are a bold man,—considering the party that is now in the ascendancy,--to have discoursed, on the Fourth of July, upon the duty and necessity of preserving peace; and I send you a paragraph cut out of the Examiner, Dec. 20, 1845.—a weekly newspa<