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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 258 258 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 86 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 59 59 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 40 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 36 36 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 29 29 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 29 29 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1846 AD or search for 1846 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
The twenty-second name on the list of grantees, for five hundred acres, was that of Joseph Garrison; The twenty-ninth name on a list compiled by Hatheway, in 1846 ( History of New Brunswick, p. 8), is Galishan,—— which clearly stands for Joseph Garrison. (Compare this writer's spelling of Marasheet. Melicete, on p.5.) the y Lloyd was born in 1776, and became the belle of the family. She was of a tall, majestic figure, singularly graceful in People's Journal. (Eng.) Sept. 12, 1846, p. 141; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847. deportment and carriage; her features were fine, and expressive of a high intellectual character; and her hair so luxuriantinions; and she remained through life a zealous advocate of those peculiar views for which she had suffered so much. As Mr. Garrison, on his visit to England in 1846, must have furnished Mrs. Howitt with these facts in regard to his mother, they are reproduced here as more authentic than any later recollections could have been.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
s paper) wishes to know of the Hon. Robert Y. Hayne, of Columbia, S. C., and the Mayor of Boston, what authority they have to put such questions? The South was mistaken in supposing the Bostonians indifferent to the defects of their legislation. Even Hosea Biglow's Mister Buckinum, The Hon. Joseph T. Buckingham. Send it to mister Buckinum, ses he, i don't offers agree with him, ses he, but by Time, ses he, I du like a feller that ain't a Feared ( Biglow papers, p. 15). But this was in 1846. whose liberal conduct of the Courier had won Mr. Garrison's admiration and gratitude, could humble himself in this fashion: It is unquestionably true, as they [the editors of abolition Lib. 1.183. papers seldom seen here and seldom mentioned but with abhorrence ] will contend, that every man has a right to advocate abolition, or conspiracy, or murder; for he may do all these without breaking our laws, although in any Southern State public justice and public safety would require his
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
upon him, and state the object of our visit to Ipswich. He treated us politely; and as Clarkson resided at Playford Hall, a distance of two or three miles from the town, he offered to postpone another engagement which he had made, and accompany us in his carriage. The retreat chosen by the aged friend of the colored race in which to spend his few remaining years on earth, Clarkson was at that time seventy-three years of age. He still had a long lease of life before him, surviving till 1846. we found to be very beautiful. On alighting at his door, Mr. Paul and myself, at the request of Mr. Alexander, strolled about the serpentine paths of the Park, while he went in to ascertain whether Clarkson's health would permit an interview at that time—as, a few days before, he had injured one of his legs severely against the shaft of his carriage. In about twenty minutes we were called into the house, and were met by Clarkson totteringly supported by Mr. Alexander. His mind was eviden