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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 258 258 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 86 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 59 59 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 40 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 36 36 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 29 29 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 29 29 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1846 AD or search for 1846 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
and graphic history of the Congress of which he was a member, and vindicated his vote for James K. Polk on national grounds. He declared that, under similar circumstances, he would have voted against General Washington himself, and that the territory between the Sabine and the Rio Grande, and stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean, was worth more to the United States than four year's administration of the government by any man who ever had been or ever would be born. In 1846 Mr. Marshall raised a troop of cavalry, was chosen captain, and served in that capacity in Mexico for twelve months. He made a gallant soldier, but, without fault of his, lost the opportunity of taking part in the battle of Buena Vista. After the war he returned to his native State. A convention was soon after called to revise the Constitution of Kentucky. He was a candidate for a seat in that body, and was beaten, because he was strongly in favor of reviving his old favorite, the law agai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Junius Daniel. an Address delivered before the Ladies' Memorial Association, in Raleigh, N. C, May 10th, 1888. (search)
nesty, insincerity, all violence to truth and every form of degrading vice. His parents possessed every prime social virtue. His education began with his grandfather and was carried forward with the youth in the most intelligent way then known to his people. He entered the excellent school of J. M. Lovejoy, who taught in this city many years and lies buried within bowshot of this hall, about the year 1843, and continued his pupil until admitted to the Military Academy at West Point, in 1846, to which he was appointed by President James K. Polk as one of the cadets at large. He was compelled by severe injuries, accidently inflicted upon him while engaged in artillery practice, to interrupt his course at the Military Academy, and his course there was not completed until 1851. He graduated with highly respectable standing in deportment and scholarship, and was ordered to Newport, Kentucky, as acting assistant quartermaster. He went to New Mexico under orders the fall of 1852