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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 263 263 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 98 98 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 40 40 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 23 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 21 21 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1847 AD or search for 1847 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
e dollar was raised to ten formerly. Edmund Quincy judged it at Lib. 16.174, 175. this time to be on its last legs; and the fall elections showed that it could send only five Representatives out of Lib. 16.194. 232 to the Massachusetts lower House, polling a total vote of about 10,000. In New York it cast but 12,000 votes, Lib. 17.11. against 16,000 in 1844. Quincy was quite right in Lib. 16.194. assuring Webb that— There are many more A. S. Whigs and Democrats than Ms. Mar. 28, 1847. Third Party men, and many more Whig papers, especially, which are more thoroughly anti-slavery than any of the Third Cf. Lib. 17.170. Party ones. There is not a Third Party paper that compares in thoroughness and usefulness with the Boston Whig, or even the N. Y. Tribune. And they have not a man who comes near Charles F. Adams (son of J. Q. A.), editor of the Whig, Charles Sumner, J. G. Palfrey, S. G. Howe, Stephen C. Phillips, and others of the A. S. Whigs, in point of character, talent
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
at the im-minent peril of his life. Early in 1847, Mr. Garrison was solicited by the Ms. Mar. 8,ur meetings were still more thronged— Aug. 19, 1847. four thousand persons being on the ground. Thnext morning, we rode to Painesville, Aug. 21, 1847. Lake County (within three miles of Lake Erie),h the next day, with a large and most Aug. 23, 1847. intelligent audience, and made a powerful impr, we began our meetings in the church Aug. 27, 1847. —nearly three thousand persons in attendance. d of dear H. C. Wright took me almost Oct. 14, 1847. as much by surprise as if he had descended froill meet at Buffalo to-morrow and Oct. 20, 21, 1847. next day, and the occasion will doubtless be on shown in January at a Liberty Party Jan. 20, 1847. Convention in Faneuil Hall, Boston, where he stial relapse, and quite incapacitated Oct. 28, 1847. up to the end of the year from taking any parteover, the finances of the paper, Ms. Dec. 17, 1847. owing to an ill-advised reduction of the subsc[7 more...]<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
hydropathic establishment had been instituted by David Ruggles, a colored man of remarkable strength of character, who had lost his sight in the Lib. 19.202. service of the Underground Railroad,—i. e., in sheltering fugitive slaves and speeding them on their way. Thus, as secretary of the New York Vigilance Committee, he received Frederick Douglass and determined his destination ( Life of Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 205.) In December, 1847, Dr. Ruggles, hearing of his relapse, had Ms. Dec. 6, 1847. offered Mr. Garrison gratuitous treatment; but not until the following July did the patient present himself. July 17, 1848. Edmund Quincy, with inexhaustible self-abnegation, again granted this release to his friend by assuming the Lib. 18.110. conduct of the Liberator, while Francis Jackson and Wendell MSS. July 13, 1848, W. L. G. to F. Jackson; Oct. 5 (?), Phillips to Jackson. Phillips conspired with others to defray Garrison's personal expenses and lighten his domestic burden. W.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
informs me that he has received a most generous W. Phillips. donation from you towards a fund intended for the benefit of my family, which a few friends are kindly endeavoring to raise, and of which I have known nothing until recently. Be assured, this fresh token of your friendship, which has been manifested on so many occasions and in so many ways, is more gratefully appreciated than words can express. The movement to raise a house and home fund for Mr. Garrison dated back to the year 1847, when his Western illness emphasized the precarious condition of his family. See (Ms. Dec. 8, 1847) Oliver Johnson's draft of a circular appeal submitted to Francis Jackson. On Jan. 1, 1849, Mr. Jackson, with S. Philbrick and E. G. Loring, executed with Mr. Garrison an indenture and declaration of trust respecting a fund which already amounted to $2289.79 (Ms.). . . . Half of the long letter from which the above extracts are taken, related to the concern felt by Miss Pease and other En
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
be desired by his clerical detractors. The first quarter of the year had been spent in and about Boston, but by the middle of April Mr. Garrison began his labors in the more distant fields. An antislavery convention had been called in Cincinnati for April 19, 1853, by the women of that city, and he was invited to attend. The scene was new to him, and he Ms. Apr. 18, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; ante, p. 207. could visit on the way the friends in Cleveland to whom he had owed his life in 1847. On the day appointed he stood on the banks of the Ohio, and beheld for the first time the slave-cursed soil of Kentucky. For him the stream was perilously narrow, yet words of welcome and of fellowship had been sped across it from an exholder, Cassius M. Clay, living yonder in a perpetual state of siege, and carrying his life in his hands. He had, while a student at Yale, in June, 1831, heard Mr. Garrison's discourse at New Haven against Colonization, Ante, 1.260; Autobiography C. M. Cl
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
well said in the debates in T. H. Benton. the House, the squatter sovereignty provided for in the bill only extends to the subject of slavery, and only to one side of that—the admitting side. Lib. 24.70. All laws to prevent the bringing in of slaves were forbidden, and the sovereigns could not pass upon and settle the question of slave or free society till a State government was formed. Meanwhile, the institution would have taken possession, and could only have been expelled by force. In 1847, a public meeting at Richmond, Va., affirmed the right to Circa Mar. 1; Lib. 17.38. take slave property into the Territories north of 36° 30′, and proposed to assert it by arms. With the right sanctioned by Congress, and settlement actually made, the whole South could be counted on to maintain the advantage by arms. It only remained to secure Federal protection for slave property in transit in the free States to complete the pro-slavery mastery of the entire Union. The reaction at the N
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
first dissuaded us from Cleveland, now advises it; In 1851, George Bradburn, who, after giving up the Lynn Pioneer, had been associated with Elizur Wright on the Boston Chronotype, removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and became one of the editors of the True Democrat (afterwards the Leader). He had greatly impaired his health by taking the stump for Fremont (Life of Bradburn, pp. 229, 233). and Mr. Tilden, M. C., Daniel R. Tilden, a native of Connecticut, Representative in Congress of Ohio, 1843-47. See in Sanborn's Life of John Brown, p. 609, Brown's letter to Tilden written in Charlestown jail Nov. 28, 1859. On Dec. 2, 1859, he participated in the mass-meeting held at Cleveland in commemoration of the execution of Brown (Lib. 29: 211). has written a letter which I consider rather favorable than otherwise, as to that locality. 5. Those who have objected to Cleveland, have only suggested points farther West, not East, especially Chicago. 6. Agitation has commenced with a view to