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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 263 263 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 98 98 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 40 40 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 23 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 21 21 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1847 AD or search for 1847 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion (search)
nt possession of what he pronounced the finest country in the world; insisting that the present occupants were as incompetent to develop its resources as the Indians whom the Spaniards had supplanted. He thought it would be a charitable proceeding, as in the interest of civilization and reformed Christianity. He regarded the corrupt church in Mexico as the curse of the country. After the war, Captain Wheat settled in New Orleans and resumed the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1847. He early acquired considerable reputation as a criminal lawyer. His very first effort resulted in the acquittal of one of his former command, charged with murder, and after the senior counsel had given up the case as indefensible. In 1848 Captain Wheat was elected one of the representatives from the city of New Orleans to the State Legislature. He also canvassed the State for the Whig candidates in the pending Presidential election, by request of the Central Committee, and had no littl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
unveiling. Miss Hill was then presented with a handsome bouquet by Sergeant A. J. Blackburn, of Company C, on behalf of the old Thirteenth Virginia Infantry. Hundreds of people shook hands with the young lady, who was evidently greatly delighted with her reception. A veteran flag. Among the flags displayed in the procession was one well entitled the Veteran. It was the silk banner presented by the ladies of Petersburg to the volunteers from the Cockade City in the Mexican war in 1847, and which was borne by that gallant body in the land of the Montezumas. It has been sacredly preserved by Colonel Fletcher H. Archer, who commanded the company in that service, as a precious historic memorial. But few of the company are now living, or they would have marched as an organization. Historic ground. It was a scene not soon to be forgotten. Dear old Blandford, with her tombs and vaults and myriad graves, was a silent witness. Marble shafts reflected the radiance of t