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hose who can so finely describe these subjects of familiar contemplation as greatly to enhance our awe, admiration, and pleasure. The Father of his Country imbued the minds of the people with his own great qualities, and great occasions invariably draw them forth. Let the noble enthusiasm and devotion of the soldiery to the cause of the country serve for an illustration. Remember the last 22d and 23d; the day had its inspiration. The battle of Buena Vista was fought February 22 and 23, 1847. There is a holy inspiration in the memory of Washington's great services that would make any American willingly risk the sacrifice of his life in emulation of them. You ought not, therefore, to be discouraged. Your subject will find sympathy in the minds and hearts of your audience if they be American .... Your affectionate father, A. Sidney Johnston. The following letters and extracts are offered without further apology: May 9, 1848. Neglect none of the subordinate means fo
retraced its footsteps and returned to Monterey. General Wool had been left in command of the Northern Department, and with some regiments of Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, and Arkansas volunteers, was encamped near where the battle of Buena Vista was afterward fought. In passing, I will state that these untried volunteers, together with the meagre force that returned from Victoria with General Taylor, composed the little army that defeated Santa Anna with his 20,000 veteran troops on February 23, 1847. Our little command united with the main force under General Wool, and General Taylor assumed command of the whole army. We encamped in the beautiful valley of Agua Nueva, twelve miles west of the ranch of Buena Vista and eighteen miles from Saltillo. Here we whiled away the time in drill and camp duty. Our encampment was as usual near headquarters, and almost any time of day we could stand in our own tent doors and see the old General sitting under the fly of a tent, conversing w
Bowers, Theo. S., April 9, 1865. Bradley, L. P., Mar. 2. 1867. Breck, Samuel, Mar. 13, 1865. Brewerton, H., Mar. 13, 1865. Brooks, Horace, Mar. 13, 1865. Brown, N. W., Oct. 15, 1867. Buell, Geo. P., Mar. 2, 1867. Burbank, Sid., Mar. 13, 1865. Burke, Martin, Mar. 13, 1865. Burns, Wm. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Burton, H. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Cady, Al., Mar. 13, 1865. Callender, F. D., April 9, 1865. Card, Benj. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Carrington, H. B., April 9, 1865. Churchill, Sylvanus, Feb. 23, 1847. Clary, Rbt. E., Mar. 13, 1865. Clitz, Henry B., Mar. 13, 1865. Craig, Henry K., Mar. 13, 1865. Crane, Chas. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Crawford, S. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Cross, Osborn, Mar. 13, 1865. Cuyler, John M., April 9, 1865. Dana, James J., Mar. 13, 1865. Dandy, Geo. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Davis, N. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Dawson, Sam. K., Mar. 13, 1865. Day, Hannibal, Mar. 13, 1865. Dent, Fred. T., Mar. 13, 1865. DeRussey, R. E., Mar. 13, 1865. De Russy, G. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Dimic
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
May 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1May 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bragg, Braxton, -1876 (search)
Bragg, Braxton, -1876 Military officer; horn in Warren county, N. C., March 22, 1817; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1837; entered the artillery; and served in the Seminole War and in the war with Mexico, receiving for good conduct in the latter several brevets and promotions. The last brevet was that of lieutenant-colonel, for Buena Vista. Feb. 23, 1847. He was made major in 1855; resigned the next year, and lived (an extensive planter) in Louisiana until the breaking out of the Civil War, when (March, 1861) he was made a brigadier-general in the Confederate army. Made major-general in February, 1862, he took an important part in the battle of Shiloh in April. He was made general in place of A. S. Johnson, killed; and in May succeeded Beauregard in command. John H. Morgan, the guerilla chief, and N. B. Forrest, the leader of a strong cavalry force, had for some time (in 1862) roamed, with very little serious opposition, over Kentucky and Tennessee
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taylor, Zachary 1784- (search)
Mexico May 18, 1846, and soon afterwards captured the stronghold of Monterey. He occupied strong positions, but remained quiet for some time, awaiting instructions from his government. Early in 1847 a requisition from General Scott deprived him of a large portion of his troops, and he was ordered to act on the defensive only. While so doing, with about 5,000 men, he was confronted by Santa Ana with 20,000. Taylor defeated and dispersed the Mexicans in a severe battle at Buena Vista, Feb. 23, 1847. During the remainder of the war the valley of the Rio Grande remained in the quiet possession of the Americans. In his campaign in Mexico he acquired the nickname of Old rough and ready, in allusion to the plainness of his personal appearance and deportment. On his return home, in November, 1847, he was greeted everywhere with demonstrations of warmest popular applause. In June, 1848, the Whig National Convention, at Philadelphia, nominated him for President of the United States,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Aug. 10, 1846 Brigadier-General Kearny takes peaceable possession of Santa Fe......Aug. 18, 1846 Gen. Zachary Taylor captures Monterey, Mexico, after a three days battle or siege......Sept. 24, 1846 Second session assembles......Dec. 7, 1846 Iowa admitted as the twenty-ninth State......Dec. 28, 1846 Battle of San Gabriel, Cal., fought......Jan. 8, 1847 Congress authorizes ten additional regiments for the regular army......Feb. 11, 1847 Battle of Buena Vista......Feb. 22-23, 1847 Battle of Sacramento......Feb. 28, 1847 Congress resolves to light with gas the Capitol and Capitol grounds......March 3, 1847 Twenty-ninth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1847 General Scott lands at Vera Cruz, Mexico, with 13,000 men......March 9, 1847 Vera Cruz surrenders after a bombardment of nine days......March 29, 1847 Army moves from Vera Cruz towards the city of Mexico under General Twiggs......April 8, 1847 Battle of Cerro Gordo......April 18, 1847 Army e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whiting, Henry 1790-1851 (search)
Whiting, Henry 1790-1851 Military officer; born in Lancaster, Mass., about 1790; joined the army in 1808; promoted first lieutenant in 1811; was placed on the staff of Gen. John P. Boyd, and afterwards on that of Gen. Alexander Macomb; promoted captain in 1817; was chief quartermaster of the army of General Taylor during the Mexican War: won distinction at Buena Vista, in recognition of which he was brevetted brigadier-general, United States army, Feb. 23, 1847. His publications include Ontway, the son of the forest (a poem) ; Life of Zebulon M. Pike, in Sparks's American biography; joint author of Historical and scientific sketches of Michigan, etc.; and editor of Washington's Revolutionary orders issued during the years 1778, 1780, 1781, and 1782, selected from the Mss. Of John Whiting. He died in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 1851.
Born at South East, Putnam County, N. Y., July 23, 1822. Cadet, U. S. Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846. Brevet Second Lieutenant, 4th U. S. Artillery, July 1, 1846. Second Lieutenant, Feb. 16, 1847. Brevet First Lieutenant, Feb. 23, 1847. First Lieutenant, 4th U. S. Artillery, Dec. 4, 1847. Resigned, Apr. 30, 1855. Colonel, 7th Mass. Infantry, June 15, 1861. Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, May 17, 1861; mustered, Aug., 1861. In the defences of Washington, D. C., July, 186ademy, Sept. 1, 1831, to July 1, 1835. Brevet Second Lieutenant, 3d U. S. Infantry, July 1, 1835. Second Lieutenant, Oct. 30, 1836. First Lieutenant, Sept. 3, 1838. Captain, June 18, 1846. Brevet Major, Sept. 23, 1846. Brevet Lieut. Colonel, Feb. 23, 1847. Resigned, Dec. 31, 1856. Major, Additional Paymaster, U. S. Volunteers, June 1, 1861; accepted, June 11, 1861. On the staff of Maj. General Fremont in Missouri, Aug. 24 to Nov. 9, 1861. Major, Paymaster for the district of Kansas, Nov. 9
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
n it. He gave evidence of his foresight by taking advantage of the moment when a portion of his adversaries had already abandoned their positions beyond the Rio Grande and were sailing in the Gulf of Mexico, to attack those that had remained with Taylor before the naval expedition, the object of which a fortunate accident had revealed to him, should call him back to the defence of Vera Cruz. He had re-created an army; and the battle which he fought with Taylor at Buena Vista (on the 23d of February, 1847) was certainly the best contested of the entire war. The American army had lost even more in quality than in quantity through the reinforcements that had been sent to Scott; with the exception of the artillery and some cavalry, it consisted only of volunteers who had not seen one year's service. It is therefore of interest to us to see them at work on the only occasion when, in the whole course of that war, they were left to themselves. It is impossible to find in the official ac
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