Your search returned 29 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
the Missouri River. Ex-Governor Sterling Price was named general in chief of these forces, whenever they could be gathered, and seven or eight brigadiers appointed to assist him, including Rains, Parsons, and others. Brigadier-General Gabriel J. Rains is a North-Carolinian, and has greatly distinguished himself throughout the Missouri campaign. He is about fifty years of age ; entered the U. S. service as brevet Second Lieutenant First Infantry, July first, 1827 ; Brevet Major, August twentieth, 1847, and held that rank in the Fourth Infantry when he joined Price in June, 1861. He was immediately appointed Brigadier General by Governor Jackson, and has been present in almost every fight. The call was immediately responded to by three or four hundred men, myself among the number; for I was tired of witnessing the tyrannical acts of Lyon, and his friends the Dutch Abolitionists. On arriving at Jefferson City, I found that all the State officers had gone to Boonville, with boat-lo
d penetrated, one above, and another below, the left nipple: death must have been almost instantaneous. Major-General Nathaniel Lyon was a Connecticut Yankee of the abolition type; not more than forty-five years of age, small in stature, wiry, active, with dark hair and complexion, small black eyes; fond of military pomp, but an excellent, though restless, and ambitious officer. He entered the United States army as Second Lieutenant, July first, 1841; was made Captain by brevet, August twentieth, 1847; and arrived in St. Louis in April, 1861, having been sent from his post far in the South-West to stand a court-martial on the charge of peculation. His great activity in aiding the suppression of Southern feeling in St. Louis endeared him to the abolitionists; he seized the arsenal, erected defences round the city, disarmed the Camp Jackson Southern sympathizers, and rapidly rose from the rank of captain to that of Major-General in two months. His cruelty to all suspected of Southe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
uld not have been ferried across the broad Potomac then. We had no steamer on that river, nor could we have used one. Mr. Davis says ( Rise and fall, I, 452): . .. Previously, General Johnston's attention had been called to possibilities in the Valley of the Shenandoah, and that these and other like things were not done, was surely due to other causes than the policy of the Administration. . .. Stonewall Jackson as first Lieutenant of artillery, U. S. A. From an ambrotype taken August 20, 1847. Then he quotes from a letter to me, dated August 1st, 1861, as follows: . . .The movement of Banks By orders dated July 19th, 1861, General N. P. Banks had been assigned to the command of the Department of the Shenandoah, relieving General Patterson in command of the army at Harper's Ferry, General Patterson being by the same orders honorably discharged from the service of the United States, on the expiration of his term of duty.-editors. will require your attention. It may be
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on the City of Mexico-battle of Contreras-assault at Churubusco-negotiations for peace-battle of Molino del Rey-storming of Chapultepec-San Cosme-evacuation of the City-Halls of the Montezumas (search)
s Shields did, but not without hard fighting and heavy loss. The enemy finally gave way, leaving in our hands prisoners, artillery, and small arms. The balance of the causeway held by the enemy, up to the very gates of the city, fell in like manner. I recollect at this place that some of the gunners who had stood their ground were deserters from General Taylor's army on the Rio Grande. Both the strategy and tactics displayed by General Scott in these various engagements of the 20th of August, 1847, were faultless as I look upon them now, after the lapse of so many years. As before stated, the work of the engineer officers who made the reconnaissances and led the different commands to their destinations, was so perfect that the chief was able to give his orders to his various subordinates with all the precision he could use on an ordinary march. I mean, up to the points from which the attack was to commence. After that point is reached the enemy often induces a change of orde
ey, R. E., Mar. 13, 1865. De Russy, G. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Dimick, Justin, Mar. 13, 1865. Drum, Rich. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Duane, Jas. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Duncan, Thos., Mar. 13, 1865. Dunn, W. McK., Mar. 13, 1865. Eastman, Seth, Aug. 9, 1866. Eaton, Joseph H., Mar. 13, 1865. Ekin, James A., Mar. 13, 1865. Finley, Clement, Mar. 13, 1865. Fitzhugh, C. L., Mar. 13, 1865. Forsyth, Jas. W., April 9, 1865. Fry, Cary H., Oct. 15, 1867. Gardner, John L., Mar. 13, 1865. Garland, John, Aug. 20, 1847. Gates, Wm., Mar. 13, 1865. Graham, L. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Graham, W. M., Mar. 13, 1865. Greene, James D., Mar. 13, 1865. Greene, Oliver D., Mar. 13, 1865. Grier, Wm. N., Mar. 13, 1865. Hagner, Peter V., Mar. 13, 1865. Haines, Thos. J., Mar. 13, 1865. Hardin, M. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Haskin, Jos. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Hayden, Julius, Mar. 13, 1865. Hays, William, Mar. 13, 1865. Hill, Bennett H., Jan. 31, 1865. Holabird, S. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Hunt, Lewis C., Mar. 13, 1865. Ibrie,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
huahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1861 Bull Run (Va.) (first)July 21,huahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1861 Bull Run (Va.) (first)July 21,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Churubusco, battle of (search)
ters about their necks as often tore it down. The battle raged three hours, when the church and the other defences of Churubusco were captured. Meanwhile Generals Shields and Pierce (afterwards President of the United States) were battling furiously with Santa Ana's men, partly in the rear of the defences of Churubusco. The Mexicans were there 7,000 strong—4,000 infantry and 3,000 cavalry—but victory again crowned the Americans. This was the fifth victory won on that memorable 20th of August, 1847—Contreras, San Antonio, the redoubt at the bridge, the Church of San Pablo, and with Santa Ana's troops. In fact, the combined events of that day formed one great contest over a considerable extent of territory, and might properly be known in history as the Battle of the Valley of Mexico. The number engaged on that day was 9,000 effective American soldiers and 32,000 Mexicans. The result was the capture by the former of the exterior line of Mexican defenses, opening the causeway to<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), San Antonio, battle of (search)
San Antonio, battle of One of three parts of a general engagement fought on Aug. 20, 1847, between the Mexican and American troops, the others being known as the battles of Contreras and Churubusco. See Mexico, War with.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
General Scott lands at Vera Cruz, Mexico, with 13,000 men......March 9, 1847 Vera Cruz surrenders after a bombardment of nine days......March 29, 1847 Army moves from Vera Cruz towards the city of Mexico under General Twiggs......April 8, 1847 Battle of Cerro Gordo......April 18, 1847 Army enters Puebla......May 15, 1847 President Polk visits the Eastern States as far as Augusta, Me., and returns to Washington......July 7, 1847 Battles of Contreras and Churubusco......Aug. 20, 1847 Armistice granted the Mexicans by General Scott......from Aug. 21 to Sept. 7, 1847 Salt Lake City founded by the Mormons......1847 Battle of El Molino del Rey ( The King's Mill )......Sept. 8, 1847 Fortress of Chapultepec carried by storm, and the city of Mexico occupied by the United States troops. Sept. 13, 1847 Gen. Zachary Taylor returns to the United States......November, 1847 Thirtieth Congress, first session, assembles......Dec. 6, 1847 By resolution Congress
chief of the Engineer Department, forwarded him the following copy of Gen eral Orders, publishing the brevets he had won on the field of battle: 1. For gallant and meritorious behavior in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico, August 20th, 1847, to be Captain by brevet. To date from August 20th, 1847. 2. For gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Chapultepec, Mexico, September 13th, 1847, to be Major by brevet. To date from September 13th, 1847. And General TottAugust 20th, 1847. 2. For gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Chapultepec, Mexico, September 13th, 1847, to be Major by brevet. To date from September 13th, 1847. And General Totten added: It affords the department high satisfaction to communicate to you the wellearned reward of your efforts on the fields of Mexico. In order to show the high estimation in which Major Beauregard was held, and the impression his eminent services had produced upon his superior officers and comrades in arms, we here insert the following letters, written with a view to dissuade him from his reported intention of resigning from the service, in the year 1856, during the lull in milita
1 2