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ect would have been disastrous; but this was successfully prohibited, thanks to the vigilance of the Provost-Marshal, General Winder. Brigadier-General John H. Winder is a native of Maryland, and about sixty years of age. He entered the service as Brevet Second Lieutenant of Artillery, July first, 1820; resigned August, 1823; appointed Second Lieutenant First Artillery, April second, 1827; Captain First Artillery, October seventh, 1842; Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel First Artillery, September fourteenth, 1847, and commanded at Barrancas Barracks, (opposite Fort Pickens,) Florida, when the war began. He has been acting as Provost-Marshal-General at Richmond during the war, and renders essential service in that department; in truth, no half-dozen men could fulfil the labors of this eagle-eyed and indefatigable old man. The greatest amount of affection seemed to be lavished upon privates; officers, for the most part, were treated coldly by the masses, and allowed to shift for themselves
re was continuous fighting until the Americans drove out the occupants. It was Lieutenant McClellan's duty — or at least he considered it to be so — to pass first into the opening. In one instance, where it was necessary to cross a vacant space between two houses which did not join, he nearly lost his life by falling into a ditch of stagnant water. The party at length forced their way through the houses till they reached those which overlooked the battery, and where they could fire upon the Mexicans who manned the guns. These having been shot or driven away, the Americans descended from the houses, took the guns, and turned them on the gate, which was forced, and the city entered. On the 14th day of September, 1847, General Scott, with six thousand five hundred men, the whole of his effective army remaining in the field, entered and took possession of the city of Mexico. With the exception of a few slight skirmishes, this was the close of the war in that part of the country
nder before Vera Cruz. In the fighting that ensued he displayed a skill and bravery, not unmixed with rashness, that won him high praise from his superior. In the reconnaissances before the victory of Contreras, he specially distinguished himself, and this was also the case at the battle of Chapultepec, where he was wounded. Having already been brevetted major and lieutenant-colonel, he was now brevetted colonel, and he took his share in the triumphant entry of the city of Mexico on September 14, 1847. He was soon busy once more, employing his talents as engineer in the surveys made of the captured city, and showing his character in endeavoring to reconcile the testy Scott with his subordinates. Later, he was put in charge of the defenses of Baltimore, and later still, in 1852, he was made superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point. During his administration the discipline was improved and the course of study lengthened. In 1855, he was promoted lieutenant-colonel of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
47 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 18
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
ght train, but I am so fatigued with traveling at night that I now propose to come in the day line. On the night of March 27 articles of capitulation were signed and exchanged, and General Scott on the 29th took possession of Vera Cruz and the castle of San Juan d'ulloa. On April the 8th General Scott began his advance on the city of Mexico, and after defeating the Mexicans at Cerro Gordo, Jalapa, Puebla, Contreras, Churubusco, and Chapultepec he attacked the capital and entered it September 14, 1847. The army occupied the city of Mexico until the treaty of peace was signed, February, 1848. The following served with the army in Mexico under Generals Taylor and Scott and afterward became conspicuous in the Civil War and are subsequently mentioned. United States army George A. McCall, assistant adjutant-general, afterward commanded the Pennsylvania Reserves in the Federal Army of the Potomac. Joseph Hooker, assistant adjutant-general, afterward commanded the Army of the Po
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
soner, and held by the Mexicans for nearly a year. At one time he generously took the place of a comrade who had drawn the fatal black bean when their captors had for some reason determined to adopt summary measures. After his release he returned to his native State and devoted himself for ten years to the practice of law. At the beginning of the Mexican war in 1846 he entered the army as captain of mounted rifles, was brevetted major for gallantry at Contreras and Churubusco, and on September 14, 1847, was among the first to enter the city of Mexico, where he had once suffered such disagreeable captivity. Continuing in the service, most of his time was spent upon the frontier. In 1848 he was commissioned major and in 1856 lieutenant-colonel. In the great sectional quarrel his sympathies were with the South. Accordingly he resigned his commission in the United States army and was appointed colonel of infantry in that of the Confederate States, to date March 16, 1861. On August 1
nch army. It was the greatest battle that had been fought in modern Europe to that time. The two armies counted upwards of two hundred thousand combatants. On the 11th of September, 1814, McDonough, on Lake Champlain, destroyed the British fleet while Macombe defeated the British army on shore at Plattsburgh. This also happened on Sunday. On the 12th of September, 1814, the British army, marching upon Baltimore, was repulsed at North Point, where General Ross was killed. On the 13th of September, Fort McHenry was bombarded (see "Star Spangled Banner.") --On the 14th September, A. D. 69, Fires entered Jerusalem, over the corpses of one million of Jews. On 14th of September, 1812, Napoleon entered Moscow. On the 14th September, 1847. the American army entered Mexico. On the 14th September, 1854, the Allied army entered the Crimes. We think it highly probably that September 1861, will not past southern movement which will rank it with the bloodless of its predecessors.