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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 3 3 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 2 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxviii. (search)
he question was raised in 1846, he was in a blustering hurry to take ground for it,... but soon he began to see glimpses of the great Democratic ox-gad waving in his face, and to hear indistinctly a voice saying: Back! back, sir! back a little! He shakes his head, and bats his eyes, and blunders back to his position of March, 1847; but still the gad waves, and the voice grows more distinct and sharper still: Back, sir! back, I say! further back! and back he goes to the position of December, 1847, at which the gad is still, and the voice soothingly says: So! stand still at that! A party of gentlemen, among whom was a doctor of divinity of much dignity of manner, calling at the White House one day, was informed by the porter that the President was at dinner, but that he would present their cards. The doctor demurred to this, saying that he would call again. Edward assured them that he thought it would make no difference, and went in with the cards. In a few minutes the Pre
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 43: thirty-sixth Congress — Squatter sovereignty, 1859-61. (search)
the rapid growth of the Republican party. This was, as Mr. Davis has elsewhere explained, the dissension among the Democrats occasioned by the introduction of the doctrine called by its inventors and advocates popular sovereignty, or non-intervention, but more generally and more accurately known as squatter sovereignty. Its origin is generally attributed to General Cass, who is supposed to have suggested it in some general expressions of his celebrated Nicholson letter, written in December, 1847. On the 16th and 17th of May, 1860, it became necessary for me, in a debate in the Senate, to review that letter of Mr. Cass. From my remarks then made the following extract is taken: The Senator (Mr. Douglas) might have remembered, if he had chosen to recollect so unimportant a thing, that I once had to explain to him, ten years ago, the fact that I repudiated the doctrine of that letter at the time it was published, and that the Democracy of Mississippi had well-nigh crucified
the year 1857, was the dissension among the Democrats, occasioned by the introduction of the doctrine called by its inventors and advocates popular sovereignty, or nonin-tervention, but more generally and more accurately known as squatter sovereignty. Its character has already been concisely stated in the preceding chapter. Its origin is generally attributed to General Cass, who is supposed to have suggested it in some general expressions of his celebrated Nicholson letter, written in December, 1847. On May 16 and 17, 1860, it became necessary for me, in a debate in the Senate, to review that letter of Cass. From my remarks then made, the following extract is taken: The Senator [Douglas] might have remembered, if he had chosen to recollect so unimportant a thing, that I once had to explain to him, ten years ago, the fact that I repudiated the doctrine of that letter at the time it was published, and that the Democracy of Mississippi had well-nigh crucified me for the construct
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Altgeld, John Peter, 1847- (search)
Altgeld, John Peter, 1847- Lawyer; born in Germany, in December, 1847; was brought to the United States in infancy by his parents, who settled near Mansfield, O.; received a public school education; entered the Union army in 1863, and served till the close of the war. In 1869 he was admitted to the Missouri bar; in 1874 was elected State attorney of Andrew county, Mo.; in the following year removed to Chicago; in 1886-91 was judge of the superior court of that city; and in 1893-97 was governor of Illinois. His action in pardoning (June 27, 1893) Fielden, Schwab, and Neebe, who had been imprisoned for complicity in the Haymarket atrocity by alleged anarchists, excited strong and general criticism (see anarchists; Chicago). His publications include Our penal machinery and its victims; Lice questions; Oratory; Its requirements and its rewards (1901); etc.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 14: European travel. (1846-1847.) (search)
onti; and a Polish lady, born Princess Radzivill. But unlike, alas! the majority of Americans in Europe, her whole sympathy was with the party of progress, and the rapid unrolling of events in 1848 made an occasion for her, such a time as I have always dreamed of, she writes. She saw the uprising against Austria; the Austrian arms burned in the public square. She was herself poor, a stranger remote from home; but she was for a time better in health than since she was a child, and her whole heart was with the Italian revolution. When Mazzini returned from his seventeen years of exile, she was able to stand by his side. She saw the republic established; she saw it fall. In April, 1849, Rome was besieged by the French army. Yet already a deeper thread than even the welfare of Italy had mingled itself in her life. In December, 1847, she had been secretly married; in September, 1848, her child had been born. But for this climax of her life I must turn to the narratives of others.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
nity, and especially among the devouter sort of Unitarians! Lib. 18.22. The Call for an Anti-Sabbath Convention in Boston had Ms. Jan. 8, 1848, Thos. McClintock to W. L. G. Ms. Jan. 10, 1848. begun to be sent out for signatures late in December, 1847. The author of it advised S. J. May that it had been drawn up with great care and deliberation, and sanctioned by a large committee of our best reformatory spirits; but Mr. May could not yield entire sympathy or allow his name to be appended Railroad,—i. e., in sheltering fugitive slaves and speeding them on their way. Thus, as secretary of the New York Vigilance Committee, he received Frederick Douglass and determined his destination ( Life of Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 205.) In December, 1847, Dr. Ruggles, hearing of his relapse, had Ms. Dec. 6, 1847. offered Mr. Garrison gratuitous treatment; but not until the following July did the patient present himself. July 17, 1848. Edmund Quincy, with inexhaustible self-abnegation, again
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
al interest in the authors. The following are identified: Reviews of M. B. Sampson's Rationale of Crime, Law Reporter, Boston, Dec. 1846, vol. IX. pp. 377, 378; of Sedgwick on Damages, Ibid. April, 1847, p. 50 of J. G. Marvin's Legal Biogaphy, Ibid. p. 552; of S. ZZZ1. Chase's argument in Jones v. Van Zandt, Ibid. p. 553; of W. S. Tyler's Germania and Agricola of Tacitus, Boston Whig, Aug. 23, 1847. the founders of the Massachusetts Quarterly, the first number of which appeared in December 1847, The last number appeared three years later. agreed upon Sumner as the managing editor, but he declined the post. Theodore Parker strenuously urged his acceptance, and it was also Emerson's desire that he should undertake the work. From various quarters during the years 1845-1851 he was solicited for addresses, articles, and editorial service, which he declined on account of the pressure of other work; namely. a paper on Webster for the American Whig Review, requested by W. M. Ev
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
ons. Boston Whig, Nov. 13, 1847. Winthrop had thus in two successive conventions defeated the leaders of the antislavery Whigs. Tills was the last struggle within the party in Massachusetts. Winthrop was the Whig candidate for Speaker in December, 1847. By natural gifts and experience he was remarkably fitted for the duties of the office. His controversies with the antislavery division of his party in Massachusetts, his moderate tone on the slavery question, and his vote for the Mexican wsition in the coming national election; but both from the first agreed that in case they failed to assume it, the duty of separate action would be incumbent on antislavery men. Sumner's other correspondents at Washington were Palfrey, from December, 1847, and Horace Mann, who took J. Q. Adams's seat early in 1848. He had requested Mann to undertake the defence of Drayton and Sayres, indicted in the District of Columbia for the abduction of slaves, and assisted him with points and authoritie
ecay and removed, 1833 Winthrop began to be built, 1808 Warren and George's Island, building began, 1833 Works said to be completed, 1850 Rebel prisoners confined at Warren, 1862 Forgeries The Miller sensation on State street, Dec., 1847 The Jackson swindle sensation, Dec., 1875 The E. D. Winslow swindle sensation, Jan., 1876 Forest Garden West Roxbury, first opened, July 17, 1878 Franklin Josiah, built a small house near head of Milk street. 1690 Had soap st, removed from Joy's Building to Court House, Sept., 1841 Removed to City Building, Court square, Sept., 1843 Occupied as Police Station, No. 2, May 26, 1854 West in Derne street, March, 1832 Removed from Derne to Leverett street, Dec., 1847 Occupied as Police Station, No. 3, May 26, 1854 North, in Ship street, March, 1810 Removed from Ship to Fleet street, 1819 Removed from Fleet to Hanover street, June, 1823 Removed from Hanover to Cross street, Dec., 1835 Remov
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
k appointed Colonel Davis brigadier-general, but he declined the commission on the ground that that appointment was unconstitutional. In August, 1847, the governor of Mississippi appointed Mr. Jefferson Davis to the vacancy in the United States Senate caused by the death of Senator Speight, and he took his seat December 6, 1847. The legislature elected him in January for the remainder of the term, and subsequently he was re-elected for a full term. His senatorial career beginning in December, 1847, extended over the eventful period of 1849 and 1850, in which the country was violently agitated by the questions arising on the disposition of the common territory, and into which the subject of slavery was forcibly injected. The compromise measures of 1850 proposed by Mr. Clay, and the plan of President Taylor's administration, were both designed to settle the dangerous controversy, while extreme radicals opposed all compromise and denounced every measure that favored slavery in any
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