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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 3 3 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 2 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for December, 1847 AD or search for December, 1847 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
nity, and especially among the devouter sort of Unitarians! Lib. 18.22. The Call for an Anti-Sabbath Convention in Boston had Ms. Jan. 8, 1848, Thos. McClintock to W. L. G. Ms. Jan. 10, 1848. begun to be sent out for signatures late in December, 1847. The author of it advised S. J. May that it had been drawn up with great care and deliberation, and sanctioned by a large committee of our best reformatory spirits; but Mr. May could not yield entire sympathy or allow his name to be appended Railroad,—i. e., in sheltering fugitive slaves and speeding them on their way. Thus, as secretary of the New York Vigilance Committee, he received Frederick Douglass and determined his destination ( Life of Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 205.) In December, 1847, Dr. Ruggles, hearing of his relapse, had Ms. Dec. 6, 1847. offered Mr. Garrison gratuitous treatment; but not until the following July did the patient present himself. July 17, 1848. Edmund Quincy, with inexhaustible self-abnegation, again