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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 282 282 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 118 118 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 45 45 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 30 30 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 24 24 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1848 AD or search for 1848 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Brooks, 1848- (search)
Adams, Brooks, 1848- Author; born in Quincy, Mass., June 24, 1848: son of Charles Francis; was graduated at Harvard College in 1870; spent a year in the law school there; was secretary to his father while the latter was serving as an arbitrator on the Alabama Claims, under the Treaty of Washington; and after his return from Geneva he was admitted to the bar and practised till 1881, when he began applying himself chiefly to literature. Besides numerous articles in magazines and other periodicals, he has published The emancipation of Massachusetts, The law of civilization and decay, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886 (search)
never practised it as a vocation. In 1829 he married a daughter of Peter C. Brooks, of Boston. For five years he was a member of the legislature of Massachusetts. Having left the Whig Party, he was a candidate of the free-soil party (q. v.) in 1848 for the Vice-Presidency of the United States. Mr. Van Buren being the candidate for the Presidency. They were defeated. In 1850-56 Mr. Adams published the Life and works of John Adams (his grandfather), in 10 volumes. In 1859 he was elected to War. He remained as American minister in London until 1868, when, in un>February, he resigned. In 1872 Mr. Adams was first a Liberal Republican, and then a Democrat, in politics. His labors in the field of literature were various. From 1845 to 1848 he edited a daily newspaper in Boston, and was long either a regular or an occasional contributor to the North American review. His principal task was the preparation of the Life and works of John Adams, and a Life of John Adams, in 2 volumes. H
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 (search)
bled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
ickens19th to 20th1826 John McKinley19th to 22d1826 to 1831 Gabriel Moore22d to 25th1831 to 1837 Clement C. Clay25th to 27th1837 to 1841 Arthur P. Bagby27th to 30th1841 to 1848 Dixon H. Lewis28th to 30th1844 to 1848 William R. King30th to 32d1848 to 1852 Benj. Fitzpartrick30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Jeremiah Clemens31st to 33d1849 to 1853 Clement C. Clay. Jr33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. George E. Spencer40th to 46th1868 to 1879 Williard Warner40th to 4 1848 Dixon H. Lewis28th to 30th1844 to 1848 William R. King30th to 32d1848 to 1852 Benj. Fitzpartrick30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Jeremiah Clemens31st to 33d1849 to 1853 Clement C. Clay. Jr33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. George E. Spencer40th to 46th1868 to 1879 Williard Warner40th to 42d1868 to 1871 George Goldthwaite42d to 45th1872 to 1877 John T. Morgan45th to----1877 to---- James L. Pugh47th to 55th1880 to 1897 Edmund W. Pettus55th to----1897 to----
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Charles Herbert, 1848- (search)
Allen, Charles Herbert, 1848- Administrator; born in Lowell, Mass., April 15, 1848; was graduated at Amherst College in 1869; and became a lumber merchant at Lowell. He served in both Houses of the Massachusetts legislature; was a Republican member of Congress in 1885-89; defeated as Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts in 1891; became Assistant Secretary of the Navy in May, 1898, and in April, 1900, was appointed the first American governor of Porto Rico.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
ngine and screw-propeller, he sailed from England May 19, 1845. They were seen by a whale-ship, in July, about to enter Lancaster Sound, and were never heard of afterwards. The British government despatched three expeditions in search of them in 1848. One of them was an overland expedition under Sir John Richardson, who traversed the northern coast of America 800 miles, in 1848, without finding Franklin. The sea expedition was equally unfortunate. Dr. Rae failed in an overland search in 18501848, without finding Franklin. The sea expedition was equally unfortunate. Dr. Rae failed in an overland search in 1850. Three more expeditions were sent out by the British government in search in 1850; and from Great Britain five others were fitted out by private means. One was also sent by the United States government, chiefly at the cost of Henry Grinnell, a New York merchant. It was commanded by Lieutenant De Haven, of the navy. There were two ships, the Advance and Rescue. Dr. E. K. Kane was surgeon and naturalist of the expedition. It was unsuccessful, and returned in 1851. Lady Franklin, meanwhile, ha
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
lton1835 to 1836 State Governors of Arkansas. James S. Conway1836 to 1840 Archibald Yell1840 to 1844 Samuel Adams1844 Thomas S. Drew1844 to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadlengress.Date. William S. Fulton24th to 28th1836 to 1844 Ambrose H. Sevier24th to 30th1836 to 1848 Chester Ashley28th to 30th1844 to 1848 Solon Borland30th to 33d1848 to 1853 Wm. K. Sebastian30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Robert W. Johnston33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. Alexander McDonald40th to 421848 to 1861 Robert W. Johnston33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. Alexander McDonald40th to 42d1868 to 1871 Benj. F. Rice40th to 43d1868 to 1873 Powell Clayton42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Stephen W. Dorsey44th to 46th1873 to 1879 Augustus H. Garland45th to 49th1877 to 1885 James D. Walker46th to 49th1879 to 1885 James K. Jones49th to----1885 to---- James H. Berry49th to----1885 to----
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 (search)
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Asboth, Alexander Sandor, 1811- (search)
Asboth, Alexander Sandor, 1811- Military officer; born in Hungary, Dec. 18, 1811. He had served in the Austrian army, and at the outbreak of the revolution of 1848 he entered the insurgent army of Hungary, struggling for Hungarian independence. He accompanied Kossuth in exile in Turkey. In the autumn of 1851 he came to the United States in the frigate Mississippi, and became a citizen. When the Civil War broke out in 1861 he offered his services to the government, and in July he went as chief of Fremont's staff to Missouri, where he was soon promoted to brigadier-general. He performed faithful services until wounded in the face and one arm, in Florida. in a battle on Sept. 27, 1864. For his services there he was brevetted a major-general in the spring of 1865. and in August following he resigned, and was appointed minister to the Argentine Republic. The wound in his face caused his death in Buenos Ayres, Jan. 21, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Astor, John Jacob, 1763-1848 (search)
Astor, John Jacob, 1763-1848 Merchant; born in Waldorf, Germany, July 17, 1763. Joining his brother, a dealer in musical instruments in London, at the age of sixteen, he remained until he was twenty. when, with a small stock of furs, he began John Jacob Astor. business in New York. He built up a vast fur-trade with the Indians, extending his business to the mouth of Columbia River, on the Pacific coast, where he founded the trading station of Astoria in 1811. By this and other operations in trade, and by investments in real estate, he accumulated vast wealth. He bequeathed $400,000 for establishing a library in the city of New York, which for many years was known by his name, and now forms a part of the New York Public Library. He died in New York City, March 29, 1848.
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