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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 278 278 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 100 100 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 43 43 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 18 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1849 AD or search for 1849 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
d among the baptisms: Hannah. Daut'r of Joseph Garrison of St. John's River in Nova Scotia but his wife a member of ye Chh here with her Child June 15, 1766. The last sentence, if punctuated thus, as it doubtless should be—but his wife, a member of the church, here with her child—is evidence of a visit of Mary Garrison to her old home at the date mentioned., Elizabeth (1767– 1815), Joseph (1769-1819), Daniel (1771-1803), Abijah (born 1773), Sarah (born 1776), Nathan (1778-1817), Silas (1780-1849), William (a posthumous child, 1783– 1837). The fifth in order, Abijah, must occupy our attention, to the exclusion of his brothers and sisters. The exact date of his birth was June 18, 1773, and the place Jemseg. He was named for his uncle Palmer. Except the romantic incident of his babyhood, already related, his early history is a blank. He alone of the family followed the sea. He became eventually a captain, and made many voyages, with his cousin Abijah Palmer as mate. His hour-glass
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
who were abolitionists by nature, and presently became so in name and generous deed. We need only mention Samuel May, uncle of S. J. May, and Charles F. Hovey. filled Faneuil Hall on the afternoon of Friday, August 21—Mayor Theodore Lyman, Jr., Mr. Lyman was born Feb. 22, 1792, and graduated at Harvard College in 1810. His interest in the State militia secured him the rank of Brigadier-General, and the customary title of General. He was mayor of Boston for the years 1834-35, and died in 1849. His relation to the abolitionists, as about to be described, was typical of that of the best citizens, among whom for humanity and public spirit Mr. Lyman was justly held in the highest esteem. being in the chair, and Abbott Lawrence a vice-president—to draw up an indictment against their fellow-citizens. The preliminary resolutions confessed Lib. 5.139, 141, 144. Boston's eagerness to lead in bowing to the Southern demand for a general Northern manifesto against the abolitionists; beli