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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 278 278 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 100 100 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 43 43 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 18 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11.. You can also browse the collection for 1849 AD or search for 1849 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Medford fifty-four years ago. (search)
of a collation, which consisted of crackers and cheese and a pail of hot coffee, in which everybody shared. There was no red-tape in those days. The collation— they called it co-lation then—was everywhere the custom, and a conflagration was not considered legally extinguished until the crackers and cheese had been properly served and eaten. There was, in 1853, no military organization of any kind. The Brooks Phalanx, which had enjoyed a nine years existence, had resigned its charter in 1849, and the Lawrence Light Guard was not formed until October, 1854. In 1853 there was no regular police force in town. If you wanted a thief caught you had to catch him yourself or get your neighbors to help you. And there really didn't seem to be much need of policemen. It was only when the village grew larger and a new element came in that the need became apparent. In the late fifties, I think it was, three constables were appointed to keep the peace, and they used to carry their badges
in his permanent home at the corner of Riverside avenue and Foster's court—as we know them today. The firm built sixty-three ships, and the partners retired in 1849 after amassing comfortable fortunes, according to the standards at that time. The first vessels built were brigs and schooners. The first ship was the Rassellacould support two churches of the seating capacity of the first, conceived the idea of forming a new parish. This was carried out, and a new building completed in 1849. To this new fold came many who had been wandering in other pastures, and the unyielding but pacific deacon saw his second church-child grow and flourish. Uppreached in it. Of the fifty-two members who formed the Mystic Church, fourteen at least were kinsfolk of Deacon James and many others were his employees. In 1849 Deacon James had retired from active business, although he was still in the prime of life. But at fifty-nine, deprived of his usual activities, he began to feel t