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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 324 324 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 82 82 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 50 50 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 38 38 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 33 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909. You can also browse the collection for 1850 AD or search for 1850 AD in all documents.

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Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Report of the Committee on Necrology of the Somerville Historical Society. (search)
as It Was, which appeared in Historic Leaves in 1903. Daniel E. Chase, born in Warner, N. H., in 1829, was a descendant of Aquila Chase, and thus in family relations with Salmon P. Chase and other distinguished men. Mr. Chase came to Boston in 1850, and in 1857 moved to Somerville. He served as a member of the first Board of Aldermen, representing Ward 2. He was elected to the School Board in 1874, and served four years. His business was that of a distiller, at first with the Boston firm of Ezra Trull & Co., and later under his own name in Somerville. In 1850 Mr. Chase married Miss Mary A. Hoxie, of Castine, Me. The first Mrs. Chase lived to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of her wedding day, dying in 1900. In May, 1904, Mr. Chase married Miss Emmeline May Grimes, who survives him. Five children are left: Charles Henry, Washington Irving, Dr. Daniel E., Jr., Mrs. Mary Ella Arnold, all of Somerville, and Mrs. Albert C. Robinson, of Reading. Mr. Chase was prominently iden
the land was under cultivation. It will thus be seen that all the present Arlington Heights, also the well-known Turkey Hill (which is half an inch lower), was included in what was anciently known as the Cambridge Rocks. Of the seventy-two-acre grant to Thomas1 Brigham, it may be said, in modern terms, that it is now in a northwest part of Arlington. While originally bounded on the north by Charlestown Line, a change in the line at the incorporation of Winchester (originally Woburn) in 1850 left a trianglar piece in the northwest corner lying in Winchester. Turkey Hill is near the centre of the grant. Forest Street runs across the property, less than a mile from Massachusetts Avenue, where one leaves the electric car. The forty-eight-acre grant of Nicholas Wyeth, which adjoined that of Thomas1 Brigham on the northwest, later passed into possession of Henry Dunster, first president of Harvard College, and was held by his descendants many years. In a bill of sale of the Duns