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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 324 324 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 82 82 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 50 50 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 38 38 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 33 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25.. You can also browse the collection for 1850 AD or search for 1850 AD in all documents.

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reet in his oldtime sleigh loaded with children and with children hanging on behind realize something of Mr. Woolley's peculiar aptness for such work. To the sketching artist with pencil or brush we are indebted for portrayal of views prior to 1850, to the photographer with his cumbrous camera, with difficulty transported, for those of the next fifty years; and all these required the aid of a middleman, the engraver (sculptor) before the printer could exercise his art-preservative. For th uplifted, fell by its own weight, and in less time than is required to state the fact, scores of men from the shipyards were on their way home to dinner, and all was quiet for an hour. . . . Mr. Blanchard occupied for several years previous to 1850, as a tailor's shop, the front part of the building on the easterly corner of what was known as Pasture Hill lane, opposite the Savings Bank building, with a workroom adjoining (Mr. William Wyman, the provision dealer, living in the rear). I think
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25., Mr. Stetson's notes on information wanted. (search)
place was west of the greatest elevation, so he did not have to excavate, but did a great deal of grading and terracing. House (Library) built about 18—. B—the Hebden house was a small two-story, ill-painted, white house, close to Mr. Magoun's east line. This and all the other eastern houses were crowded to the sidewalk. It had no back yard. Very steep right up behind the house; coarse grass on the steep; no gravel visible. An English laboring man named Hebden lived here about 1845 to 1850. Built——. Query: Get the construction dates of every house. C—the John Johnson house was old, black, gambrel roof; may be very old; built A. D.——. He had two sons, Theophilus and Cleopas. Mrs. Johnson, a brisk, little, clear-starching dame, had no particular clothes-yard, and dried her clothes anywhere. She had a very narrow lean — to back of the house—no back yard. Steep went right up from the lean-to. Coarse grass on it; no red gravel visible. D—John Johnson's Cob