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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 324 324 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 82 82 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 50 50 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 38 38 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 33 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28.. You can also browse the collection for 1850 AD or search for 1850 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28., Old ships and Ship-building days of Medford. (search)
tion of speed of greater importance. The first vessel built in this part of the country on these ideas was the Game Cock, built by Samuel Hall at East Boston in 1850, and the same year James O. Curtis of Medford built the Shooting Star, 900 tons, for Reed and Wade of Boston. She was one of twenty-six ships which made the passad Jacket and Game Cock. Captain Clark mentions twenty-three Medford ships in a list of one hundred and seventy-three extreme type of clipper ships built between 1850 and 1857, and in a record of one hundred and twenty-eight passages made to San Francisco in 110 days or less between 1850 and 1860, from New York or Boston, sevent1850 and 1860, from New York or Boston, seventeen were made by thirteen Medford ships as follows:— ShipDaysPort of DepartureDate of Arrival Shooting Star105BostonAug. 17, 1852 Courser108BostonApril 28, 1852 Phantom105BostonApril 21, 1853 Golden Eagle105BostonAug. 25, 1854 Don Quixote106BostonMarch 29, 1855 Ringleader107BostonFeb. 12, 1856 Ringleader110BostonFeb. 8,
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28., The beginning of a New village. (search)
dows, but big door openings in its ends. It was not a very old barn, perhaps thirty or forty years then. How it ever escaped the tornado of '51 or the incendiary fires of the years before the war always seemed a mystery. We utilized it for a shop and storehouse for two years, until it was taken down and a house built of its good material. High street is the old way to the weare, the road to Menotomy, which became West Cambridge in 1807, but took the name of Arlington in 1867. But until 1850 a portion of old Charlestown intervened between it and the river. In 1870 there were only five houses in that strip along the street and none on the Medford side, so there was an unobstructed view of the village and church spires of Arlington from the railway platform at West Medford. We saw a broad open plain, level at first, and sloping gradually to the river's edge, with but here and there a tree, beyond the pear trees left on the Smith garden plot. The Brooks estate was bordered with