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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 324 324 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 82 82 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 50 50 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 38 38 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 33 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1850 AD or search for 1850 AD in all documents.

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o Washington, to be tried for mutiny, disobedience of orders, &c. The result was he was sentenced to be dismissed the service. The President approved the verdict, all but that part touching mutiny, and then remitted the sentence — which was a pity. John Charles, however, resigned in disgust, and went in search of some more adventures among the mountains. Being a citizen of California, he was elected to represent that State in the United States Senate, when it was admitted into the Union in 1850; but he had the ill luck to draw the straw which represented the short term, and he held his seat but a few months, being actually but three weeks in the Senate. His per diem did not amount to much, but he did not complain of the mileage. He after wards ran for President, but the result did not then seem encouraging. John Charles Fremont married Jessie, the daughter of the celebrated landscape painter. Old Bullion, who once took a thirty years view of the United States Senate, with th
ressed him in tones of affecting pathos, many a manly eye was moistened, and many a stern heart beat quicker, as their possessor turned away to hide the emotion he could not suppress. Senator Phelan. The Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser says that Mr. Phelan, one of the Confederate States Senators from Mississippi, served his time at the printing business in the Democrat office, Huntsville, Alabama, where he was born, and afterwards conducted the Tuscaloosa Flag of the Union, both as printer and editor. He studied law in the office of his elder brother, Judge Phelan, in Marion, Alabama, and soon after returned to Mississippi where he rapidly rose to distinction. Senator Phelan has been a disunionist since the fraudulent admission of California in 1850. Patriotic Contributions. Mrs. Elizabeth Rives, of Albemarle, has contributed for the soldiers near Manassas one hundred pair of socks. Mrs. P. B. Scott and Mrs. Mary Lewis has also sent a large number to the soldiers.