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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 231 231 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 110 110 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 85 85 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 26 26 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1851 AD or search for 1851 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 231 results in 212 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, George Burton, 1851- (search)
Adams, George Burton, 1851- Educator and historian; born in Vermont in 1851; Professor of History in Yale University. His late works include: Civilization, during the Middle ages; Why Americans dislike England; The growth of the French nation; and European history, an outline of its development. Adams, George Burton, 1851- Educator and historian; born in Vermont in 1851; Professor of History in Yale University. His late works include: Civilization, during the Middle ages; Why Americans dislike England; The growth of the French nation; and European history, an outline of its development.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry A., Jr. (search)
Adams, Henry A., Jr. Born in Pennsylvania in 1833. Graduated at Annapolis in 1851. Took part in the engagement with the forts at the mouth of Canton River, China, in 1854. Was on the Brooklyn at the passage of Forts St. Philip and Jackson in 1862, and also participated in the attack on Fort Fisher. Was highly praised by Admiral Porter in his official despatches.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adler, Felix, 1851- (search)
Adler, Felix, 1851- Educator; born in Alzey, Germany, Aug. 13, 1851; was graduated at Columbia University in 1870 and then studied in Germany. In 1874-76 he was Professor of Hebrew and Oriental Literature at Cornell University; and in 1876 he founded the New York Society of Ethical Culture, before which he has since lectured on Sundays. On May 5, 1901, at its twenty-fifth anniversary, in recognition of Dr. Adler's services, the society presented him with $10.000 as a nucleus of a larger fund the income of which is to be employed in developing the natural gifts of worthy young men and women. Dr. Adler is a member of the editorial board of the International journal of Ethics. His publications include Creed and deed; The moral instruction of children, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agricultural implements. (search)
rus H. McCormick, then of Virginia, and late of Chicago, took out the first patent on his reaper, which has since come into such general use. This reaper, with improvements patented in 1845 and 1847, received the first prize at the World's Fair of 1851, where American reapers were first introduced to the notice of Europeans. At the International Exhibition at Paris, in 1855, American reapers were brought into competition with others, each machine being allowed to cut an acre of standing oats neeing the reel, the divider, the receiving platform for the grain, and the stand for the raker. American reaping-machines are now used all over Europe where cereals abound. The automatic rake was patented by a Mr. Seymour, of Brockport, N. Y., in 1851, and in 1856 Mr. Dorsey, of Maryland, patented the revolving rake, which was improved upon by Samuel Johnston, of Brockport. in 1865. The first self-binder was patented by C. W. and W. W. Marsh in 1858. The first threshing-machine used here w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), America's cup, (search)
America's cup, The popular name of a yachting trophy originally called the Queen's Cup, which was offered by the Royal Yacht Squadron of England in a America's cup. competition open to the yachts of all nations in 1851. The cup was won by the Boston-built schooner-yacht America. Since then there were challenge contests in 1870, 1871, 1876, 1881, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1893, 1895, and 1899, and in each instance the cup was defended by American yachts, with success. In 1895 Lord Dunraven's yacht, Valkyrie, after having been defeated in one race, won the second, but was deprived of the victory because of a foul. The Englishman claimed that he had been cheated, and refused to race again. He charged the American yachtsmen with unsportsmanlike conduct, and visited this country to press his charges. His complaints were dismissed and he was dropped from the list of members of the New York Yacht Club, under whose auspices the races had been held. One of the most notable of the several
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, George Leonard, 1828- (search)
Andrews, George Leonard, 1828- Military officer; born in Bridgewater, Mass., Aug. 31, 1828; was graduated at West Point in 1851, entering the engineer corps. He resigned in 1855. In 1861 he became first lieutenant-colonel and then colonel of the 2d Massachusetts Regiment. He was made brigadier-general in 1862, and led a brigade in Banks's expedition in Louisiana and against Port Hudson in 1863. He assisted in the capture of Mobile, and was appointed Professor of French at West Point Feb. 27, 1871; was retired Aug. 31, 1892; and died April 4, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbitration, international. (search)
or more friendly powers had been invoked. The treaty was to remain in force five years. The failure of the treaty does not mean that the United States is averse to arbitration as a means of settling national difficulties. This country has always been foremost in that line. But circumstances were against the measure at that time. At the very moment Great Britain was negotiating the treaty with the United States, her war-ships were firing upon the patriots of Crete. One of the great forces in the United States in favor of arbitration is the International Peace Society, originally formed in England. Its first great convention was held in London in 1851. The submission of the Venezuelan question to arbitration marked the eighteenth question that had thus been disposed of by the United States and the twenty-sixth that England had thus submitted. See Bering sea arbitration; arbitration, tribunal of, for Alabama claims ; Venezuela and Cleveland, Grover for Venezuela arbitration, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
ed in an overland search in 1850. Three more expeditions were sent out by the British government in search in 1850; and from Great Britain five others were fitted out by private means. One was also sent by the United States government, chiefly at the cost of Henry Grinnell, a New York merchant. It was commanded by Lieutenant De Haven, of the navy. There were two ships, the Advance and Rescue. Dr. E. K. Kane was surgeon and naturalist of the expedition. It was unsuccessful, and returned in 1851. Lady Franklin, meanwhile, had been sending out expeditions in search of her husband, and the British government and British navigators made untiring efforts to find the lost explorers, but in vain. Another American expedition, under Dr. Kane, made an unsuccessful search. In a scientific point of view, Dr. Kane's expedition obtained the most important results. It is believed that he saw an open polar sea; and to find that sea other American expeditions sailed under Dr. I. I. Hayes, a mem
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Asboth, Alexander Sandor, 1811- (search)
Asboth, Alexander Sandor, 1811- Military officer; born in Hungary, Dec. 18, 1811. He had served in the Austrian army, and at the outbreak of the revolution of 1848 he entered the insurgent army of Hungary, struggling for Hungarian independence. He accompanied Kossuth in exile in Turkey. In the autumn of 1851 he came to the United States in the frigate Mississippi, and became a citizen. When the Civil War broke out in 1861 he offered his services to the government, and in July he went as chief of Fremont's staff to Missouri, where he was soon promoted to brigadier-general. He performed faithful services until wounded in the face and one arm, in Florida. in a battle on Sept. 27, 1864. For his services there he was brevetted a major-general in the spring of 1865. and in August following he resigned, and was appointed minister to the Argentine Republic. The wound in his face caused his death in Buenos Ayres, Jan. 21, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Audubon, John James, 1780-1851 (search)
Audubon, John James, 1780-1851 Ornithologist; born in New Orleans, May 4, 1780; was the son of a French admiral. Educated at Paris, he acquired much skill as an artist John James Audubon. under the instruction of the celebrated David. At the age of seventeen years he began to make a collection of drawings of the birds of America, and became a most devoted student of the feathered tribes of our country. So early as 1810 he went down the Ohio River with his wife and child in an open boat. to a congenial spot for a forest home. He visited almost every region of the United States. In some of his Western excursions, Wilson, the ornithologist, was his companion. In 1826 he went to Europe to secure subscriptions to his great work, The birds of America. It was issued in numbers, each containing five plates, the subjects drawn and colored the size and tints of life. It was completed in 4 volumes, in 1838. Of the 170 subscribers to the work, at $1,000 each, nearly one-half came
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